A Conversation for Wallasey, Merseyside, UK

Naming of Wallasey

Post 1

Researcher 199798

As a person born in Wallasey, I understood that Wallasey derived it's name from 'Wall against the sea'. Most of the old sea front behind the wall at Harrison Drive and Leasowe is below sea level.


Naming of Wallasey

Post 2

Drusilanne

I'm from Wallasey (excellent) and I think its called Wallasey because of the wall in New Brighton against the sea. Wall-a-sey.

smiley - devil*Deepest Sympathy*smiley - devil


Naming of Wallasey

Post 3

AEndr, The Mad Hatter

No, actually it's derived from the anglo-saxon "Wallas eig" - which means "Isle (eig) of the Welshman (wallas)" Wallasey is actually an island - surrounded on all sides by water, though the water between us and the rest of the Wirral is rather built over nowadays.
Similarly, meols is anglo-saxon for "sand-dunes"

It's nothing to do with the sea-defences,which were built many many years after people settled the area and called it Wallasey.

I'm from Wallasey Village, by the way.


Naming of Wallasey

Post 4

Drusilanne

Wow, me too! Your the first person online who know's where it is! Oh thanx! That's cleared that up!
smiley - devilDrusilannesmiley - devil


Naming of Wallasey

Post 5

AEndr, The Mad Hatter

Pleased to meet you, smiley - devilDrusilannesmiley - devil

smiley - chef├ćndrsmiley - chef


Naming of Wallasey

Post 6

Bazz

You sound as though you are interested in the history of the Wirral, and are very informed on the subject. However, I think that you'll find that the name is actually of Norse origin, not Anglo-Saxon, as is the name Meols, though you are right about the meaning. Apparently, the Norse who colonised the Wirral called all indigenous inhabitants 'Welsh' - hence 'island of the Welsh'. It must have been an area the Norse failed to gain a foothold, possibly because of the fact that at high tide it would have been cut off from the rest of the Wirral.
I'd love to have a time machine capable of visiting the past, wouldn't you?


Naming of Wallasey

Post 7

AEndr, The Mad Hatter

Ah - I was told AS from an historian who researched the Wirral extensively. I would love to visit the past - but I would go to Roman times or to Ancient Celtic times.


Naming of Wallasey

Post 8

Bazz

I too, would love to visit the ancient past, but only to observe from a safe distance! I would hate to do without my (modern) creature comforts. I would love to see how hunter/gathers lived, for instance, or how agriculture took over, but I would not like to live under those conditions. My central heating is broken at the moment, and I have come to a complete standstill! If I had a time-machine, it would have to have all mod cons, I'm afraid, and I'd don't think I would be tempted to leave it, as in the H.G. Wells story! Far too risky!


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