24 Lies a Second: The Age of Cage

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The Age of Cage

Every once in a while a film comes along which you can tell that the usual channels of publicity and distribution are struggling to cope with – it's a bit left-field, in other words, possibly doing something weird with genres, and it's not at all clear who the actual target audience is. One pretty reliable sign of this is that the trailer for it starts showing up in all sorts of odd places, as the result of a 'enough mud sticks' advertising strategy.

The current case in point for this sort of thing is Tom Gormican's The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent. The title itself is perhaps a bit indicative as it sounds like it might be a reference to something else, but it's not clear exactly what –   The Unbearable Lightness of Being? Incredibly Loud and Extremely Close? Something else entirely?

Things start off conventionally enough, as a young woman is kidnapped at gunpoint. The film pays an unusual level of attention to the film she's watching at the time, however (it is the rather good 1997 action movie Con Air), particularly its star, Nicolas Cage. However, we are soon off into the strange netherworld where The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent takes place.

We find ourselves at a meeting between film director David Gordon Green (David Gordon Green) and actor and movie star Nick Cage (Nicolas Cage). Cage is, it seems, an insecure, self-obsessed, and almost pathologically needy egomaniac, who insists on performing selections from Green's latest script in the restaurant where they are having lunch. (Nick Cage is haunted by the spectral figure of his own uninhibited younger self; the actor credited in this role is 'Nicolas Kim Coppola'.) Barely credibly, he does not get the part, which has an unfortunate influence on Cage's mood and the resulting contribution to his teenage daughter's birthday party. His latest ex-wife (Sharon Horgan) throws him out as a result, sending him into a bit of a slump. (I feel the need to make it clear that Nicolas Cage and Sharon Horgan have never actually been married in what is generally agreed to be real life.)

Salvation, financially at least, comes when Cage is invited to Mallorca for the birthday party of an immensely rich super-fan, Javi (Pedro Pascal) – basically a paid personal appearance. It doesn't do much for his mood, however, and Javi is appalled to discover that Cage is considering giving up acting – especially as he hasn't even read the screenplay Javi has written for him yet.

But Nick Cage finds he has bigger problems, when he is picked up off the street by the CIA. Lead agent Tiffany Haddish reveals that Javi isn't just an innocuous multi-millionaire, but the head of an international criminal cartel which has recently kidnapped the daughter of an influential politician. The CIA needs someone on the inside of Javi's compound to locate and free the missing girl – could this be the role that Cage has been waiting for?

Well. Deciding whether this film is for you or not is a fairly straightforward question, and that question is 'Do you want to spend one-hundred-and-seven minutes watching Nicolas Cage send himself up?' Clearly someone believes there is a large enough audience that does, although this same someone may also have spent too much time on the internet and listening to the dozens of podcasts which concern themselves with the actor and his career. It is quite hard to imagine this film being made with any other actor in the lead role, mainly because Cage has become such an outlandish and mockable figure over the few years or so – stories abound about his 'nouveau shamanic' acting method, while his career trajectory over the last few decades (from Oscar-winning Hollywood A-lister to a string of DTV movies with titles like Jiu Jitsu and Kill Chain) would also indicate a career experiencing a degree of crisis. (I should perhaps mention that a Cage renaissance may well be in progress: Cage's most recent movies have received favourable reviews and – perhaps more importantly – played in theatres.)

Whatever else this film has going for it, it is built around an immensely game and extremely funny performance by Cage himself, although of course it's hard to be sure just how much of a stretch it is for Nicolas Cage to play Nick Cage. (Fictional-Cage's personal history is slightly different from real-Cage's.) It's probably also worth mentioning that this is an essentially generous film, with no sign of any desire to really mock or deride its star (it's doubtful whether Cage himself would have been dumb enough to sign up for such a role).

Beyond that, it's a little unclear exactly what the idea behind this film is, beyond perhaps just being the Nicolas-Cage-iest movie ever made. There's something quite meta and undeniably clever about the way the film manages to combine elements of the sort of semi-experimental film Cage was occasionally appearing in twenty years ago – he played a fictionalised version of Charlie Kaufman, not to mention Kaufman's entirely fictional twin, in Adaptation – with the kind of action-movie nonsense which has bulked out his career since parting company with the mainstream last decade. But the emphasis is always on knockabout, broad comedy and Cage hamming it up; there's a suggestion of something cleverer and more subtle – Nick Cage and Javi start collaborating on a screenplay, which as it develops takes on a suspicious resemblance to the plot of The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent – but this extra layer of self-referentiality is not as central to the movie as it would be if this really was a Kaufman script.

Nevertheless, it's all ridiculous enough to be consistently entertaining, and Cage is well supported by Pascal and Horgan (who is as majestic as ever). The Javi role is a tricky one, as it calls for someone who can work opposite Cage without being completely overshadowed, but who still isn't what you'd call an actual star in the same way he is. Pascal is a shrewd choice for this, as he's currently experiencing a bit of a career moment, but also best known for a role where he has a bucket on his head most of the time. He is clearly a smart enough actor to figure out that he's here to support Cage rather than actually co-star in the movie, but manages to do so in a way which should earn him some credit.

In some ways a knockabout, acutely self-referential comedy is the last film you would expect to find Nicolas Cage appearing in – but then this actor's cult has largely been born of his willingness to make unusual choices. It would be nice to think that such a distinctive and charismatic performer has another act left in his career that will see him return from the DTV wilderness and do some genuinely interesting work again. It's quite hard to tell whether The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent is a step on that journey or just another nail in the coffin of the whole idea of Nicolas Cage as a serious actor, but – always assuming you enjoy watching Cage – it's a lot of fun while it lasts.


Also This Week…

…Guiseppe Tornatore's Ennio, aka Ennio – Il Maestro, almost certainly has the loveliest soundtrack of the year, being as it is an exhaustively detailed documentary on the life and work of the composer Ennio Morricone, who died in 2020.

For a lot of people Morricone is still most closely associated with the whistles, twangs, and howls of the spaghetti westerns he scored for old school friend Sergio Leone, but the film goes far beyond these, covering his work as an arranger, avant-garde composer, and provider of music for literally hundreds of films. One contributor suggests that Morricone's best work is prima facie evidence for the existence of a higher power; I wouldn't necessarily go that far, but there are some beautiful tunes here. The sheer length and occasional earnestness of the film may be a bit off-putting for some, though.

…Simon Curtis' Downton Abbey: A New Era. Meet the new era, same as the old era. Zzzz.

(The considered opinion of one healthcare professional of my acquaintance was that 'This is a film for people with dementia'. I feel I should mention that they enjoyed it a lot more than I did.)

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