A Conversation for Two-Storey Outhouses of the United States

From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 1

wildcat58

Sa-lute!

Well, one story one's anyway.

I also remember going to a every small school for my early education. A two room school-house, grades 1-8. We had two outhouses,two two-hole outhouses. One for the boys, and one for the girls. The year? 1964.

Wildcat58


PS. We had an outhouse at home back then, too.smiley - erm


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 2

Dmitri Gheorgheni

I remember outhouses from the sixties, too. Some of my relatives were Tennessee hillbillies, others lived in the Mississippi Delta. Never saw a double-decker one, though - must be a Yankee invention.

As children, we were afraid of the outhouses, because sometimes you got unwelcome visitors, like spiders. It makes you cautious.smiley - smiley

The entry is just great! There needs to be another one on outhouse reading matter, though - what about Sears and Roebuck catalogs?


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 3

wildcat58

It wasn't so much the spiders I was afraid of, it is the snakes. smiley - yikes Oh, and furry critters. I always hated going out there at night.

I never saw a two-story one either, don't know that I would want to USE one.

We always had TP at home. For school, mom always made sure I carried tissues, because the school couldn't keep TP.

Yep, always heard the catalog jokes. I don't know that much about reading matter, I was just learned to read when we moved to a new house and a new school. I do know in the winter nobody would have taken a book with them, it was just to dang cold! There's nothing quite like a cold draft and the threat of frost bite to make you want to take care of all your business in a hurry. smiley - run


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 4

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Can you imagine how cold the two-story ones were that could only be used when there was 30 ft of snow? (Brr.)smiley - snowball


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 5

flyingtwinkle

30 ft of snow remind me of dachas and log huts


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 6

wildcat58

I thought it was bad in East Tennessee when I was a kid and the snow was knee deep (to me). I can't imagine it being 30 feet deep. Here in the Tennessee Valley we rarely get snow anymore.

I think this past winter I saw maybe a quarter of an inch (5-7mm) total on my back deck. That only lasted a few hours.

Up in the mountains, they get more, and were we lived when I was a little girl, they get more snow too. But still not nearly as much as we did back in the '60's.

smiley - yikes 30 feet of snow, I'm sure the old chamber pots were used a lot in those days too. Pity the poor soul who had to empty them.smiley - erm


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 7

Dmitri Gheorgheni

I remember being up in Lost Creek, TN, one winter as a child. No snow, but it sure was cold, except around my grandfather's woodstove.

We lived in Memphis. I was 11 before I ever saw snow.

Then we moved to Chicago, and got a bait of it.smiley - snowball


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 8

Malabarista - now with added pony

We had an intersting one in our vacation house in Sweden, it had real toilet seats and was a three-holer!


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 9

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Aha! The outhouse story goes international!


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 10

Malabarista - now with added pony

It's not like we never had them here... smiley - winkeyeIn a lot of old European cities the structures that jut out over the river and in many cases have been turned into balconies or bay windows were in fact privies...


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 11

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Not to mention castles!


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 12

Malabarista - now with added pony

Yes, they usually had one over the moat... And isn't a port-a-potty or whatever you'd call those strange blue things used at festivals and construction sites basically an outhouse?


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 13

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Yes - though only one-storey, usually. And what about the elaborate ones I've heard about in Paris?


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 14

Malabarista - now with added pony

Haven't been to Paris except the airportsmiley - erm


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 15

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Nor have I. But I heard somewhere that they had elaborate ones that were dangerous because of the self-cleaning mechanisms.


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 16

Malabarista - now with added pony

Oh, self cleaning mechanisms are widely used. Is there any special danger? Do you mean the ones that wash the whole cabin? There are some public ones in France that are coin-operated. They play music at you, when it stops you have about 30 seconds until the door automatically opens...


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 17

Dmitri Gheorgheni

You're kidding! So you have to be fast??? Outrageous!

I heard they were dangerous if you were caught inside when they were self-cleaning, because of the chemicals. But maybe they fixed that.


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 18

Malabarista - now with added pony

The time is reasonable, but it's supposed to prevent them from being used for other purposes, like doing drugs or making babies...


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 19

Dmitri Gheorgheni

I refuse to make the obvious comment on that one...smiley - loveblush


From a southern gal who remembers them.

Post 20

Malabarista - now with added pony

smiley - huh

I don't quite follow...


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