A Conversation for The Giordano Bruno Crater

Great Article

Post 1

Mister Matty

Being a romantic sort, I like looking at the moon through my battered old binoculars of a clear night. I've always been fascinated by the craters that cover it's surface because I've often wondered what it looked like when the meterorites hit the lunar surface. It should, I suppose, have been obvious that someone must have witnessed this in history and recorded it in their own way. smiley - moon


Great Article

Post 2

anhaga

The sad thing for romantic sorts (like you and me) is that the evidence suggests that these individuals didn't actually see a lunar impact.smiley - sadface


Great Article

Post 3

Mister Matty

I know that now, having read the article a bit more smiley - winkeye but they evidently saw something.

And surely with all those craters there must have been an impact some time in human history?


Great Article

Post 4

anhaga

should I be a total wet blanket and say " the vast majority of those craters are about three billion years old" and follow with a bunch of mathematics?smiley - smiley No, I think I'll say "somebody must have seen something. Not necessarily -- hold on, I just remembered something. Let's see if I can find the link. Here it is: video from 1999: http://science.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/ast22nov99%5F1.htm

I guess I don't have to be a wet blanket.smiley - biggrin


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