This is the Message Centre for el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

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Post 1

retiringviolet

Hello El D, have added you to my friends list.O.K. I hope? I like your posts! Vi


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Post 2

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

Hello Vi. That's good, I'll do likewise. This site's such fun. I enjoy posting and reading other folks' posts too. Although we're all different in our 'take' on things we also have a sort of common thread, that's great.

Lessmiley - spacesmiley - smiley


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Post 3

retiringviolet

It's sort of interesting re: likemindedness. I suspect we all drift into groups where we have things in common. Most internet sites seem dross, H2G2 seems very civilized and, well, thoughtful by comparison.
I've picked up from your posts & poesy, that I like you. I' ve never gone in for "chat" rooms, always thought it rather strange. It's quite interesting making friends with people you've never seen. As you can see I'm very curious about it! Wondering whether seeing people leads to preconceptions & misconceptions. Having said that, maybe we don't see others faults via the internet. Interesting stuff to think about. 21st
century thoughts! Vi smiley - smiley


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Post 4

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

smiley - space
I'm sure that's right Vi - self-selection and therefore some coinciding of interests and maybe temperament too. I like the way h2g2 seems to encourage and attract polite, tolerant interaction and appreciation of each others' differences. I must say it fits well into my Quaker ethos! We have fun and it all remains very, as you say, civilised. "Gets my vote", as my Texan brother-in-law would say!

Lessmiley - spacesmiley - smiley


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Post 5

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

I have to go to lunch now but will be back again a little later!

Les

smiley - smiley


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Post 6

retiringviolet

Civilized & good manners etc is the only way to go. A lot of that good stuff has been lost in this decadent, greedy era. I keep thinking civilization is about to collapse! Are you in Devon, I lived in C'wall for a long time- Redruth. Now in Australia, and time for bed,have a good day! Vi
P.S. Quakers are a good lot. (humanitarian)smiley - smiley


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Post 7

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

smiley - space
Funny isn't it, you in Australia and me in the UK, chatting as though we were in the same room!

I live in West Dorset, close to the sea, in a village in a beautiful valley. Right now though I'm volunteering as a "Friend in Residence" at the Quaker Study Centre at Selly Oak, Birmingham. Hence taking off for lunch when it was served - and very nice it was too! We have a top-class chef and the food here is always imaginitive, nutricious, beautifully prepared and extremely tasty. What's more, I don't have to cook it!

Lsmiley - spacesmiley - smiley


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Post 8

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

smiley - space
PS There's a website (of course!) should you want to see what it's like and what we do.

www.woodbrooke.org.uk

smiley - smiley


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Post 9

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

smiley - space
Typical! I forgot to link it. Try again:

http://www.woodbrooke.org.uk

smiley - smiley


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Post 10

retiringviolet

Hello El D,
Sorry, I laid off the computer yesterday, as I really am a bit addicted, and I've got psoriasis on my elbow from leaning on it. Yes it is strange to be chatting at this distance.
I wonder how all this modern technology is affecting us all, My son- 15 is now playing one of those horrible games where people drive round running over each other. I still remember when there was a big debate about allowing sex and violence on T.V. I was against censorship then, now I think I've changed my mind.
I yearn for a more innocent world. I've been really pre-occupied with this lately, and wonder how it could be achieved, and what's causing people to behave so badly these days. There seems to be a new "ethic" occurring, (particularly on the media), which says that it's alright to be vindictive, violent, if the other person has done something wrong. Is this coming across in the U.K.? Is it because law-enforcement is not what it was?
Tell me what you think. I just don't understand modern times. Will have a look at Woodbrooke. Years ago I used to know relatives of the Frys.Take care, Vismiley - smileysmiley - tea


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Post 11

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

smiley - space
Hello Vi. That's very strong-willed of you to abstain from the computer! I do know just what you mean and I'm probably a fairly hopeless case of computer-addiction. To be fair, I did spend some considerable time today refurbishing an Excel spreadsheet that had been trashed by somebody. Learning curve!

I do find 'nasty' computer games rather abhorrent and certainly don't play them myself. I feel that although one game in isolation may not be too harmful in itself there seems to be a growing trend for such games. If you browse any list of games the majority seem to be violent to some degree. That's what I think is indicative of their harmful effect and it is worrying that the makers know that this type of game is the most likely to sell best.

Oh yes, an innocent world would be so good! One thing is for sure: that we can't turn the clock back. We can only start from where we are. Much as we might look back longingly to years ago, by definition the past is gone and we can only move on. That should be good because it causes us to look for positive solutions. The 'retribution' ethic you refer to is of course not confined to individuals. The state has taken hold of the confrontational principle and this can be clearly seen at work any day of the week in a court of law. Our whole legal process is based on adversarial principles and the resulting treatment of offenders is very negative, being biased towards punishment of the person rather than restoration of harmony and order.

Anyway, I've gone on a bit. It's good to hear from you again and do let me know what you think of Woodbrooke when you've had a chance to browse the site.

el D
smiley - smiley

smiley - cappuccino


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Post 12

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

It being 11.30pm here I'm off to my bed. Goodnight Vi.

smiley - smiley


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Post 13

retiringviolet

Mornin', It's me again.(stop groaning) Had a look at Woodbrooke. What a lovely house! When you've lived in another country for a long time, it's an odd thing, but you forget things you knew in your country of origin. I have some vague idea that the Quakers had a large hand in prison reform. Is that right? I know Rowntrees did a lot for their workers, and they were Quakers, weren't they? I'm not religious, but if I were, Quaker would probably be one of my first choices.
Re : modern society,- did you have an American series on there called "Dexter" It's quite vile, this policeman goes round gruesomely murdering people with the justification that they're bad.The viewer is supposed to be on his side!- That's what I meant about this new vindication ethic. Whatever is happening to the world! I can cope with global warming, but not this kind of stuff. I just wish I knew what I could do to help change things.smiley - hugVi


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Post 14

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

smiley - space
Hello Vi - g'day if you like, since I never know what time of day it is here let alone where you are!

Glad you liked the look of Woodbrooke. It is a very special place and I always enjoy being here. We often have people from the BBC team, filming a series just across the road, staying here. They work long hours at some pressure and as they come through the door in the evening they almost invariably stop inside the front door and let out a deep sigh of contentment. It's that sort of place that exudes peace and serenity although there is also a great deal of laughter and fun when the place is fairly full of visitors.

You're right about Quakers being involved in prison reform, both historically (Elizabeth Fry etc.) and in the present day too. They were big in chocolate too! which can't be bad. This house is the former home of George Cadbury and the whole Bourneville village was built by him for the workers. It was all rather paternalistic of course but that seemed to be ok then.

I'm not sure I would call myself 'religious' either - in fact I definitely wouldn't - but I am aware of having a spiritual dimension to life. For me it's all part of being a whole person. That's probably why I'm a Quaker. Whilst Quakers have their roots in Christianity we are a varied bunch and I think it's fair to say that most would say their thinking and beliefs are much wider than that. Some can even reconcile their atheism with being a Quaker and there is quite a significant universalist group. It's more about the way of life and life-view than belief in a deity in whatever form one might conceive that. Personally I think more in terms of the life-force of the universe than a deity. It has a sort of logic about it that would be supported by modern scientific thinking.

Dexter? I don't recall hearing of it but thanks for the warning! I mostly watch humour or 'nature' programmes and give a wide berth to anything that threatens to be nasty. Even some of what passes for humour ends up getting the order of the off-switch! I agree, it's hard to imagine what difference one individual can make in the face of what seems to be an unstoppable force or trend. One thing I have learned is that although the big picture might look overwhelming there is often some influence that can make a local impact, sometimes something that you're already doing, not even a new venture or deliberate effort. Be yourself, hang on to your principles, gently show others that there is another way of doing things. End of sermon. Quakers don't do sermons!

I enjoy these exchanges and it's always good to hear from you so keep 'em comin'. If we're going to be h2g2 friends my real name is Les.

So 'til next time,
Lessmiley - spacesmiley - smiley


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Post 15

retiringviolet

Hi Les,
Sorry I've been so long in replying, excuse is that I've been having a difficult time lately. Yes, I enjoy hearing from you too. Thank you for your advice, awful truth is I'm getting less and less trusting as I get older, and experience more and more rotten behaviour, from more and more people - (do I sound gloomy)?
Did you ever see a film called The Mouse That Roared- (I think)-would've been 50's/ 60s. It was about a vicar (Peter Sellars), who was a really kind, good, nice fellow, allowing himself to be naive about people, who took advantage of him left, right, and center. People thought him a bit of a mug, and in the end he got sent off to space in a rocket. Sometimes I feel a bit like that, and lecture myself about not being so trusting, but then I get back to that attitude again. It's a pain in the neck, and I do wish I'd become more dubious about people.
Oh Well,- probably too late to change now!
Take care and have a good Xmas. I've not even begun to organize ours yet. Bigsmiley - hug, write soon, By the way my true name is Lu x


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Post 16

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

Hi Lu,
I've been kinda preoccupied myself the last few days. We'll be away at my daughter's for Christmas and there seem to be too many things to be done before we go - surprise, surprise!

I remember the title "The Mouse That Roared" but couldn't have said what it was about. The trust thing is difficult. I try to trust people in general but sometimes get caught out. There's a balance between trusting and being sensibly wise I think. It's not an easy one to strike is it? You sound like a nice person and that's not something you should change - or could really. It's a dilemna we have often when we're working in places like Africa. Our norm is to trust everyone but sometimes we just have to hold them at arms' length until we're sure.

Anyway, it's now getting rather late here so I'll wish you a very happy Christmas in case we don't get to talk before then. Enjoy yourself!

Les
smiley - hug


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Post 17

retiringviolet

Have a lovely Xmas dear Les. Look forward to hearing from you soon!smiley - hugsmiley - smoochsmiley - kiss( This is not to be divulged to your Missus!)smiley - bubblysmiley - laugh


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Post 18

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

Just popped in to say hi Lu. Thanks for all the wishes and smiley - kisses. I won't breathe a word! But I most certainly will return the sentiment: smiley - kiss!

Have a great time yourself. Might pop in tomorrow to see what's afoot (yes I know: 12") But if I don't, I'll talk to you again soon.

smiley - bubblysmiley - spacecheers!

Les


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Post 19

el D – for the sake of brevity and out of respect for my fellow Glums

smiley - space
Hi Lu!

I guess it's already 2009 for you so Happy New Year!

smiley - cheerssmiley - spacesmiley - magicsmiley - spacesmiley - bubblysmiley - space

Let's hope it will be a better one for us all.

New Yearsmiley - hugsmiley - spacensmiley - spacesmiley - smooch

Les


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Post 20

retiringviolet

Greetings to you my dear Les. Late in replying, but feeling very lazy, and in the category of Your fellow Glums at moment. It's hot, and torn a tendon in a foot- (12"). My imagination and energy, and various other bits aren't working well at the moment. I get worried when I feel that way, as it creates a backlog of
THINGS THAT MUST BE DONE,
and I've heaps of those anyway. Hope you enjoyed Xmas and New Year, I wish you a really excellent one.smiley - hugsmiley - hugsmiley - hugVi xxx Keep warm! I wish you open fireplaces and hot comforting soup.smiley - smiley, and a nice, warm tartan, scarf to wrap round your nose, and mouth, and some gloves that don't get lost. (I miss winter walks)


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