A Conversation for The Lounge

Pass the password

Post 1

Paigetheoracle

Looking at the jumble of letters,numbers and symbols I use for different passwords, made me realize that it is the pattern or layout I remember - the rhythm, not the individual letters etc. that helps memorization. It's like a musical keyboard and I remember the shape I plonk out. Does anybody else have tricks for memorizing their passwords or pins, rather than using words alone that have significance for them alone or numbers that carry patterns?


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Post 2

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

Unlucky Orwell retired early

Unlucky: 13
Orwell: 84 (as in 1984)
Retired early: 62


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Post 3

ITIWBS

I use simple substitution codes and ciphers.


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Post 4

Baron Grim

XKCD has a great comic regarding passwords. It convinced me to switch to using a six random word password and also to switch to using a password manager.

http://xkcd.com/936/


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Post 5

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

smiley - online2long


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Post 6

Recumbentman

I use Harry Lorayne's system for remembering numbers. Converts them into words that you can connect into ludicrous images. Works.


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Post 7

ITIWBS

Humor helps.


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Post 8

Paigetheoracle

Harry Lorayne? How old are you? I remember reading one of his books in my youth (or did I read it in my bed?).


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Post 9

Recumbentman

I read the Harry Lorayne book in or before my early teens, around 1960. His first book, apparently, How To Develop a Super Power Memory. I still remember and use his system for transforming multi-digit numbers into startlingly memorable images.

He also said that older people often forget whether they have locked their door and the like, and recommended doing it with exaggerated gestures, bordering on the painful, while visualising the key penetrating their hand and blood spurting out. Then you remember doing it all right.


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Post 10

Paigetheoracle

Trouble with that is at my age (66), my skin is so thin that if bump into anything, blood spurts out anyway, like in The Monty Python sketch, Anyone For Tennis?


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Post 11

Paigetheoracle

That's the one I read too


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Post 12

Paigetheoracle

Oh by the way, when it comes to patterns, I look for these on the keyboard, in layout or sounds. For instance, though you can't see one or hear one at the start, eventually you can. I changed the last sound of one word group to the American pronunciation and that meant the last letter of a regular pattern, rhymed with the first letters sound in a password's other group of three I used. Other visual layout patterns might remind me of a safe's combination or crossword - 2 to the right, 4 down, one to the left of that. Memory, whether verbal or visual helps too, when there is no obvious pattern to the random numbers, letters and symbols I pick.


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Post 13

ITIWBS

Outrageous puns are sometimes easy to remember.


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Post 14

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

Inrageous seems to have the same meaning as outrageous, though the former is obsolete.


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Post 15

ITIWBS

smiley - erm


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Post 16

Baron Grim

"Most of these mines are inert. However some of them are ert." - the drill sgt. from Private Benjamin (IIRC)


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Post 17

Paigetheoracle

Obsolete? Don't you mean Absolete as in Absolete rubbish?


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Post 18

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

smiley - cross I'll have you know that my rubbish is of the first quality.

smiley - winkeye


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Post 19

ITIWBS

...absitively, posilutely...


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Post 20

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

The local Federation of Mice swears by my rubbish. smiley - winkeye


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