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Hugs and Kisses

Post 1

J

"Americans are not touchy-feely people. They tend to carry a two-foot radius of personal space around with them and regard anyone who invades it as rude. When it is necessary to breach the walls of personal space, Americans do it with their arms only, reaching across the void for a handshake. Americans do not do the "Hello! *hug kiss kiss* How are you? Oh that's too bad, *hug kiss* feel better and oh thank you so much for the gift *hug kiss kiss* that you sent I just love it" thing that Europeans so adore. Hugs and kisses give Americans a creepy feeling, somewhat akin to the feeling you get when you imagine being covered in spiders."

You obviously haven't met my family smiley - smiley

Maybe an update to A4080502 is in order though?

smiley - blacksheep


Hugs and Kisses

Post 2

Leo

*Dodges hugs and kisses*
My grandmother does the hugging and kissing too, but she's imitating Europeans. She likes us to say "aunt" and not "ant". My high school principal hugs a lot, but she also bursts into tears at the slightest provocation, so I wouldn't use her as a paradigm.
...but you say you have a family of full-blooded Americans who hug and kiss happily?


What do you mean:
>>Texans are joking when they do things bigger?


How does everyone else pronounce 'lieutenant'?

EF:
>>It would be futile to attempt to explain why teh US has a fascination with watching people running around,
- Is there an explanation? smiley - bigeyes

Update? You mean a paragraph about not being huggy-kissy? It's your entry... But you can feel free to use my paragraph. smiley - ok


Hugs and Kisses

Post 3

J

Yeah, I dunno about full blooded, I'm not 100% sure what that means, but they're thoroughly American huggy kissy luvey dovey smiley - winkeye

"Left-tenant." rather than Loo-tenant.

Looks like I misspelled the word "the" smiley - erm

I'm just kidding though. I thought your intro was kind of interesting, so I decided to bother you about it.

smiley - blacksheep


Hugs and Kisses

Post 4

Leo

I suppose full-blooded means around for a couple of generations. Enough to shed those barbaric European practices, like kissing hello. smiley - yuk And thank you. And feel better. smiley - ill Like folks do here. 'senough to put a person off his food.

You're kidding about left-tenant, yes? I mean, there's no 'ft'. Do Canadians also pronounce it that way?


Hugs and Kisses

Post 5

J

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lieutenant#Pronunciation

I'm not 100% sure about Canadians. I think anhaga (do you know anhaga here?) once told me that as much as it annoyed him to say it, the American way of saying loo-tenant has a stronger etymological foundation. So I think Canadians say lev- or left-tenant. You'd have to ask a Canadian though.

smiley - blacksheep


Hugs and Kisses

Post 6

Leo

never heard of an anhaga - a hootooer, you mean?


Here's one from the life of the American General George Washington, who, you know, set the precedent for very many American things:

Alexander Hamilton dared the governor of New York to thump Washington on the shoulder and say, "It's so nice to see you again!"
When the governor did, Washington delicately removed the offending hand and froze its owner with a glare.

He was less frigid when it came to dancing the minuet with every single female at his inaugerational ball. (His wife wasn't there. She was in bed with a cold.)


Hugs and Kisses

Post 7

J

Yeah, anhaga. An old friend of mine. He's a Canadian, has written some good entries in his day.

I think you're referring to the story of Gouverneur Morris and Washington? smiley - smiley I don't think he was ever really a governor of any state, his first name was Gouverneur (which I think is a horrible first name).

As an American, you've gotta love Washington (I think there's a law...), but he was a stick-up-the-butt kind of guy. Adams, Washington and Jefferson weren't much for "hugs and kisses", but look at Alexander Hamilton, Sam Adams and Ben Franklin, or even Gouverneur Morris, whose role as a Founding Father is much underappreciated. They weren't shy. And anyways, Adams, Jefferson and Washington had good reasons for being quiet and reserved. Washington had ivory teeth. Adams had gout, and just about every malady imaginable, and was in a lot of pain throughout his life (though he did like to yell). Jefferson had a lisp, and natural shyness.

I'd say Washington's reservedness has set a precedent for Americans in the same way that his tales of truthfulness have set a precedent for the American media - which is to say, not at all.

smiley - blacksheep


Hugs and Kisses

Post 8

Leo


smiley - rolleyesNote to self: Never teach history to a history buff. I'll take your word he wasn't a governor, though I coulda sworn it was spelled that way... Will double check.

Anyway, having false teeth doesn't make one less huggy - just less smiley. Washington was just a cold fish. Among other things. But surely you aren't telling me Hamilton hugged people? Well, male people. I understand he wasn't against hugging anyone of the opposite gender. I wouldn't put it past Franklin to be huggy, but he was a strange bird. smiley - erm


Hugs and Kisses

Post 9

J

Unfortunately, most historical anecdotes from that time period don't involve hugging and kissing. Just that one you mentioned, but it does show that Morris, who I believe authored the Preamble to the Constitution, wasn't against hugging. The way I heard it told, he was bragging about how close and friendly he was with George, and Hamilton called his bluff.

I'm not saying Washington et al weren't cold fishes. I'm just saying that they weren't necessarily symptomatic of the times. Washington had to be austere and cold to be so universally respected. Jefferson was just shy by natural, probably stemming from his lisp and feminine personality, though he was supposedly very charming in person. Adams was just a crabby old jerk who thought everyone was out to get him, but even he could be quite effusive with his wife. They had their reasons.

Hamilton is one of my favorite historical figures. I believe he would be more comfortable in the US today than anyone else in the revolutionary generation. But again, I don't have any good evidence about him hugging and kissing. He was in no way shy, though. He was effusive to his friends, and when he was angry with someone, he was loud in person and in print.

But anyways, I wouldn't count on those guys to set too much of a precedent. I mean you could also use Washington (who only had one tooth when he was President) and Adams (who was completely toothless when he was older) as evidence that Americans don't go to dentists, but they were a creation of their times.

smiley - blacksheep (I'm actually starting an entry on the Founding Fathers, so this is quite an appropriate discussion)


Hugs and Kisses

Post 10

Leo

Hamilton and Jefferson brought out the best in each other - best one-liners, anyway. smiley - biggrin Both splendid historical characters, though getting killed in a duel is pretty dumb (the ity rate was pretty low even then, wasn't it?), and also allowed Jefferson to get the last word.

Wasn't Hamilton one of those republican-style folks who didn't trust the common man? There are quite a few founding fathers who would wince at our current state of affairs, just politically.

But since I think you're meaning economically, maybe you can answer a question I've had since high school American History. My teacher kept calling Hamilton "The Genius Behind the National Bank". Never bothered explaining the point of a national bank, and I gather it didn't last beyond Andrew Jackson (another great character...) So, which part of it was genius, and is our current Federal Reserve something similar?

...If I may push my argument a drop more: sounds to me like Morris wouldn't have put his arm around anyone without being dared. smiley - tongueout Nobody *liked* being toothless, but austerity could be cultural. smiley - erm Then again, that time period was pretty formal, so I doubt they would be hugging and kissing anyway.

PS: Didn't you swear off h2g2 a while back? You post with suspicious frequency.


Hugs and Kisses

Post 11

J

Giving a charter for a National Bank did a lot of things that were important to the nation's development. By the time of Jackson, the US pretty much had its act together, fiscally. The First Bank of the US helped put America on fiscally sound ground when it was in sketchy waters at first.

One thing it did was print money. Another was to help establish credit, to take out loans internationally. If there wasn't a national bank, there would have been a bunch of state banks, which makes trade pretty difficult. When Jackson shut down the National Bank, boom, Panic of 1837. Hamilton had a lot of success at centralizing America's trade, finance and currency issues. It wasn't just the national bank, he made the Federal government assume all the war debts of the various states to pay them off collectively, which meant he raised taxes. The Fed, today, is different I think. It's not really a bank. It's a government entity, but the National Bank was a private company.

Hope that helps.

If I recall, Gouverneur Morris was a pretty bombastic kind of guy. I think he'd put his arm around anyone he wanted to.

I never swore off h2g2. I've just been busy. smiley - smiley I used to be much more active, though.

Not surprisingly, I disagree about Hamilton. It's not that he didn't trust the common man. He was a common man. He was born, illegitimate to a poor woman on an island in the Caribbean. He was worried that the people would get too passionate about certain things, and would make rash decisions, so he favored checks to make sure that didn't happen too much.

As for getting killed in a duel, it wasn't the worst thing that could have happened. Honestly. Some people even think he lost the duel on purpose. Burr, who might have been a major force in US Politics, and who Hamilton knew to be a crazy insane person, came off looking like a crazy insane person who shoots to kill in a duel. Hamilton came off looking like a martyr. NYC had a big funeral for him. The press stopped savaging him for his sex scandal and their claims of him being a monarchist, etc. He really didn't have much of a political future at that point, so for a hyper-ambitious person like Hamilton, it makes sense that he would try to duel Burr. That's the explanation for why he might have thrown the duel.

But really, I doubt he realized his life was in danger. I don't think he would have gone to duel if he had quite so much to live for, but like you said, not that many people died in duels in those days. Burr really was a lunatic. He shot to kill.

Jefferson and the Republicans were ascendent at that time. Hamilton was less and less popular and influential all the time. I doubt it would have mattered who had the last word.

smiley - blacksheep


Hugs and Kisses

Post 12

Leo


smiley - doh Thanks - that just pulled together my profile of Hamilton with a Hamilton quote I just came across in a booklet about the Supreme Court - that he wanted it to ensure that laws were the will of the whole people and not the will of the legislature that express only the temporary will of part of the people. Very smart. smiley - ok

Yes - the banking explanation did help.

You're insinuating at a well-planned by Hamilton. I somehow can't believe Hamilton would have enjoyed letting Jefferson make sarcastic comments about him after he died, even if he was losing political ground. Or that he was making calculations.

When did they start putting presidents on the currency?


I think I signed onto volunteer schemes just when you were signing off of all of them - would have created the appearance of a zippy exit. smiley - ok


Hugs and Kisses

Post 13

Leo

... that should read "well planned suicide."
smiley - erm This terminal has a filter on it. Which means random words can disappear at odd times.
Preview!


Hugs and Kisses

Post 14

J

Let me be clear, I have no idea what Hamilton was thinking about when he decided to duel Burr. Probably his honor more than anything. But he must have realized that, politically, he stood to lose very little if he died. He would not have gone to a duel if he was at the height of his power and the forces of Federalism could have been wounded by his death. That's my opinion anyways. He was someone who thought of everything in terms of politics.

I have no clue at all about the currency thing.

I'm still an ACE for some reason. I have the badge anyways. And I'm still listed as a Co-Editor of the UnderGuide :/ The Volunteer Schemes are great, but I don't have time for them anymore. I would like to be a Curator, simply because I enjoy reading the entries on the front page when I feel like it, and I look over my own entries frequently (if I need to remember a quote or story I liked from Lincoln or Hamilton, I usually find my own entries to be invaluable resources smiley - winkeye ) and I always find these little things I wish I could change. I posted something in EF just today, too. Nobody's responded yet.

smiley - blacksheep


Hugs and Kisses

Post 15

Leo

Not big on a personal life, I gather. smiley - erm

How does one become a curator? Do you need to be recommended by someone with a very very low U-number? Or just Gnomon? smiley - laugh


Hugs and Kisses

Post 16

J

These days, more so than before.

Is my U-number not considered low yet? (201497)

smiley - blacksheep


Hugs and Kisses

Post 17

Leo


Just checked the homepage. It's by invitation only. smiley - bigeyes Exclusive club, that one. Not for ordinary muck-amucks like me. If you get 100 entries, it could put you on the radar. Maybe.


Hugs and Kisses

Post 18

Leo


...may I stick you on my friends list? I've never had a vice president on before, though I've got a president. I was thinking it would be nice to collect the whole set. Is there a treasurer? Must nab. smiley - run


Hugs and Kisses

Post 19

J

Sure. And I was elected Class Treasurer in my high school if that helps smiley - smiley

smiley - blacksheep


Hugs and Kisses

Post 20

Leo

I doubt it. But nice try. smiley - ok

One last question... what's with the sheep?


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