This is the Message Centre for Danny B

Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 1

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

Specifically this one: A883523 Colour Blindness. smiley - rainbow

I'd particularly like to update the section on diagnosis to include especially more on other tests other than Ishihara pseudo iso-chromatic plates, particularly those that make use of brightness contrasts and the CIE 1931 colour space which predicts lines of confusion for dichromats and anomalous dichromats who can detect different hues but do not discriminate for brightness.

I'd like to add more about what colour blindness means to those who have it, which means reviewing the "effects" section to include other permutations of colourblindness (tritanopia, tritanomly) and how blindness doesn't mean 'blindness' but confusion due to the shortening of the visible spectrum from misaligned or omitted frequencies.

I'd like to add more in to help for those with colour vision deficiencies such as online tools for naming colours. (enter the RGB number)

Guidance for those who use colour (Colourblindness simulators and correctives) - this could be general but I'd like to angle it towards websites and website managers to check those with colourblindness can see easily and what this means in practice (using colours and being aware of contrasts that all visitors can see) and what it doesn't (print everything in monotone.)


I, for instance, don't agree that "In society, little importance is attached to colour blindness." It may be that colourblindness is not well understood - I grant you that - but colour and how it is used is extremely prevalent. For those of us who have difficulty, recognising, identifying and making use of colours, the problem isn't just traffic lights but extends to a lot more. Making people more aware of what the difficulties are, would help to address the fact that "the only contact that some people have with colour blindness is when it used as an example of a sex-linked condition in a basic biology lesson."

Are you agreeable to this project?

If so let me know.

Clive. smiley - biggrin


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 2

Danny B

Hi Clive smiley - smiley

The article was originally a Flea Market rescue that I guided through PR rather than actually wrote, so I'm sure it would benefit greatly from the changes you suggest. Go for it! smiley - ok

smiley - cheers


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 3

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

Fantastic.

So shall I testpage the Guidml and send to you my inclusions for a review of what I've done, and then ship it off to PR etc?


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 4

Danny B

Depending how much you plan to add/change, you could do it through <./>Feedback-editorial</.>

"If the information is more than a few paragraphs, but less than a full reworking, the information can again be submitted via Editorial Feedback. For the update to be accepted, however, it must be presented with explicit directions as to why the update is required, as well as directions as to what goes where/replaces what and it should be in full GuideML, including links."

As a Curator, I can make your changes directly to the article and add you as an author.

Alternatively, I'm happy for you to submit it to PR as a full update - I'm subscribed there so I'll see it when it appears.

smiley - cheers


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 5

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

I'm not planning to rewrite all of it (much of what is already there is good) - my goal is to increase on what's there - however as a means of working I'd like to edit the entire page, and then if needs be, submit as is, or just copy > paste the I've changed parts to you, with the directions.


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 6

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

This will be the first article I've done for the edited Guide in a *long* time so it'll be a kind of dry run for future articles.


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 7

Danny B

Fair enough - just let me know when you're happy with it then smiley - ok


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 8

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

Thanks Danny.

I've decided I'm going to attempt a full re-write.

I spent this evening trying to work out the structure and I had too much information so I decided to spread it out. I'll re-use some of what was in the original and update it.

If you are interested to see what I am up to

This is the Guide Entry: A48088948

I'll start filling in the details as I go.


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 9

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

Danny, with your SExpert hat on, can I just run a little basic science past you?

Energy, including light, is transmitted in discrete 'packets' or 'quanta' - hence quantum physics (I think this was the work of Neils Bohr) In terms of light the quata are photons, neither particle or wave but both, and in the case of white light composed of all frequencies in the visible spectrum, mixed.

When white light falls upon a coloured surface, the white light is absorbed BUT the specific wavelength of the coloured surface, excites the atoms (of which the coloured surface is made up - and from which the colouration is derived on an atomic level. These atoms 'emit' a photon in response, equal to the wavelength of the absorbed light that originally excited it.

It is this 'new' emitted photon which is ultimately intercepted by the retina of an eye and triggers the psychological perception of colour.


In short, although we talk normally of light reflecting off surfaces, and in the case of colour of specific wavelengths of lights reflecting off surfaces am I right to think that the quanta of energy packets behave in the way I've described, because ultimately all surfaces are composed of atoms.

Thanks.

This is for the introduction, where I'm aiming to describe how colour vision works, and how colourblindness is a malfunction of that.


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 10

Danny B

I'm afraid I'm the wrong sort of SExpert for that question! It all sounds plausible, but I just don't know enough physics to be able to say one way or the other smiley - sadface


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 11

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

That's fine, smiley - smiley

I'll run it past the others.


Danny, could I update one of your articles please?

Post 12

Clive the flying ostrich: Amateur Polymath | Chief Heretic.

Posted. Now we'll see if I'm right. smiley - geek


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