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Closing the book

Post 561

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/m/marktwain141773.html


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Post 562

Cracking toast, Gosho

Take two.

Brian Matthew
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-39541162


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Post 563

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

Okay, the reports are no longer exaggerated. smiley - doh


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Post 564

Cracking toast, Gosho

Robert M. Pirsig
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/04/24/525443040/-zen-and-the-art-of-motorcycle-maintenance-author-robert-m-pirsig-dies-at-88

I'll be honest, I haven't read Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance for probably 35 years, and I haven't owned a copy for at least 30. If I read it again today, having seen and done so many things since then, I don't know whether I'd find it as inspiring as I did then, but it might be interesting to try.


Closing the book

Post 565

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

I tried to read it, but it didn't grab me. Sometimes I think that people are getting the message to go to extremes in pursuit of enlightenment when they read Zen literature. I'm not sure that the real meaning of Zen came through in translation, though. Remember, the culture that gave the world Zen also gave it thoughts like "Don't push the river, it flows by itself," and "not too much ying, not too much yang." To become a Zen master requires a long period of tutelage by an experienced master. How, then, can we westerners expect comparable wisdom to come form reading some book that has, as its most redeeming feature the fact that it was on the bestseller list at one point? Maybe I'm exaggerating, but I knew someone who was crazy and unbalanced, and she was a huge fan of AATAOMM. Not much of a recommendation for the book, is it? smiley - erm


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Post 566

Cracking toast, Gosho

Leo Baxendale
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-39730388

I can't think of many others who gave me so much pleasure as a kid. Maybe John Noakes, Gerry Anderson and...

Diane Rigg smiley - bigeyes


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Post 567

Cracking toast, Gosho

Geoffrey Bayldon
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39885577

Plenty of actors have had career-defining roles, particularly anyone who's played Doctor Who (which Geoffrey Bayldon turned down, twice), and Catweazle was certainly one of those. It was a tour de force of characterisation. And because it included a kid who was around the same age as me at the time, well, who wouldn't want a friend who was a wizard from 800 years ago, who lived in an old water tank and who might be able to get you the numbers of the next Premium Bond jackpot smiley - tongueout


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Post 568

Cracking toast, Gosho

Not a water tank. A water tower. Why couldn't I think of that? smiley - rolleyes


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Post 569

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

Bayldon? I've seen him in 7 movies and one TV series ["All creatures great and small"]. "Tom and Viv" was memorable for me. I thought the math "test" they gave T. S. Eliot's wife to prove her mental incompetence was extremely unfair. smiley - grr Very few people could have passed it.


Closing the book

Post 570

Cracking toast, Gosho

Ian Brady. That is all.


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Post 571

Cracking toast, Gosho

Leo Baxendale, Geoffrey Bayldon, and now...

John Noakes smiley - sadface
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-40083025


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Post 572

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

I guess it's too late to get to know him. smiley - sadface


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Post 573

Cracking toast, Gosho

This isn't exactly turning into 2016, but another one sad one...

Peter Sallis smiley - sadface
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-40165443

Know around the world as Clegg from Last of the Summer Wine (and the last of the original three stars - Michael Bates as Blamire and Bill Owen as Compo were the other two; Michael Bates died early), and of course, as the voice of Wallace, and all of that after a long acting career beforehand. Not a bad life.


Closing the book

Post 574

Cracking toast, Gosho

Anita Pallenberg
https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2017/jun/14/anita-pallenberg-dies-aged-73-rolling-stones-performance-keith-richards

A 1960s icon. I must find myself a copy of Barbarella. It's been too long since I watched it anyway. I remember that film being trailed at the cinema when I was a kid - either at Saturday morning flicks or when I went to see a film like Batman (see below) or Thunderbird 6. Not the sort of film you'd expect to see trailed in front of a cinema full of 10-year-old boys like me, with a description that included the line "She strips in space" smiley - bigeyes


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Post 575

Cracking toast, Gosho

Adam West
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40235142

I don't think I'd heard of Batman before the Adam West/Burt Ward series, even though I used to buy imported Action comics from a local newsagent, but I loved it. Watched it every week. Superheroes take themselves too seriously these days smiley - tongueout


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Post 576

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

I liked that series.

Not all superheros take themselves too seriously these days. Deadpool and Antman come to mind as examples. I think the studios rely on comic book characters too much, but I may be part of the problem, as I dutifully go to see many of their movies.


Closing the book

Post 577

Sho - with added slapping hand

the Gruesome Twosome call the Adam West Batman series "adorable Batman". Says it all really


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Post 578

paulh, not fond of Lord Mudpants

Well, you won't get an argument from me about Burgess Meredith as the Penguin. smiley - ok


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