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Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 1

SashaQ - happysad

Hi Tav smiley - biggrin

I'm your Sub-editor for Ancient Greek Architecture. The new version is A87920094 - please subscribe!

I enjoyed reading this again - it will be an asset to the Edited Guide smiley - ok

I notice there were a couple of outstanding questions in the Peer Review thread - I changed the bit Dmitri pointed out. I wasn't quite sure about the introduction before, but on second reading I like it - buildings are clearly mentioned in the second paragraph so you have set the scene well smiley - ok

I had just a few little questions as I read through:

What is a 'cornice'?

"or the need for the whole temple including its base being in fact bent upwards in its centre" - I can't visualise 'bent upwards' - can you describe that more for me, please?

What is a 'cella'?

Thank you! smiley - ok


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 2

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

smiley - hug Hi

A cornice is a decorative part of a building. Um... hard to explain for me because to me it seems to be such a basic term. It's a horizontal element, you may know it from old houses as a number of concave and convex elements under or above a window or below the roof. https://stuckleistenstyropor.at/pub/media/catalog/product/cache/6/thumbnail/312x157/beff4985b56e3afdbeabfc89641a4582/g/e/gesims-koln.jpg

The base of the temples were not completely flat but each side is slightly going upwards to its center. This picture is a very exaggerated version: https://www.math.uni-bielefeld.de/~ringel/opus/panorama/kurvatur1.jpg

The cella (think 'cell') is the windowless chamber in the center of the temple, used to store the statue of the god it is dedicated to.


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 3

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

I'm trying to think of a footnote for 'cornice'.


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 4

SashaQ - happysad

Thank you smiley - hug

Thanks for explaining the curvature and the cella - I have tweaked accordingly smiley - ok

Reading again, I could visualise the cornice as something sitting above the frieze, but the phrase "The cornice is large, cantilevered and shows many ornamental decorations" made me wonder if I was thinking of the right thing - how should I visualise 'cantilevered'?

smiley - ok


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 5

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

cantilever means something that sticks out without being carried by a column or something.
https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-24c53521ba8b1aabb3b1f76ae260cd55

In case of a temple:
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/58000/58095/58095_ionic_order_md.gif
As you can see the cornice gets larger to the top. It stretches more and more outwards. In this case the cornice is not only concave and convex but has quite elaborate decorations.

(the more simple concave and convex cornices in much later are mostly made of stucco and undrlying plaster or even bricks. The builders had a wooden mold with the negative shape of the cornice, which they would pull along the facade horizontally to get the shape they wanted. In the 19th Century lots of shapes also came as pre-fabricated clay or concrete pieces which were stuck to the wall and painted.)


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 6

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

Footnote for cornice:
A cornice is a decorative element on a facad which usually spans the whole length of a building and defines different horizontal areas on the facade. They can be located for instance above the base, below the roof, between two storeys of define a horizontal band of windows. Simple cornices are just raised stripes of plaster. More elaborate versions are built up of concave and convex shapes or even ornamental decorations that repeat many times over the length of the building.

Does that make sense?


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 7

SashaQ - happysad

Thanks Tav - the Cornice footnote makes sense, so I added it in and can visualise it too smiley - ok

Thank you very much for the diagrams of 'cantilevered' - I was visualising the 'braced cantilever with tensile stay' because I have seen bridges that use that technology. I didn't realise there were also 'simple cantilever' and 'braced cantilever with compressive strut' so I learned a lot there smiley - ok I've added a footnote, but feel free to suggest changes.

Have a read through and let me know if everything is OK for you smiley - ok


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 8

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

smiley - smiley thanks a lot for subbing, I think it's good.

... now I have to finish the picturessmiley - run


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 9

SashaQ - happysad

smiley - ok


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 10

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

Ok, idea for the last paragraph:

A very last sentence
Everything floatsPanta Rhei - everything floats - a famous quote by the philosopher Heraclitus who wanted to describe that nothing ever stays the same and everything is in a constant state of flux., but the Greeks continue to leave their impression on human culture.


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 11

SashaQ - happysad

Thanks Tav - I added that in and applied the photos too so the Entry looks great smiley - ok


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 12

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

smiley - cheers Thank you!


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 13

h2g2 Guide Editors

Congratulations! Your Entry is on the Front Page today smiley - magic


Subbing Ancient Greek Architecture

Post 14

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

Thank you!smiley - biggrin


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