A Conversation for 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Peer Review: A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Post 1

Bluebottle

Entry: 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film - A87906379
Author: Bluebottle - U43530

A film review sequel.

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A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Post 2

SashaQ - happysad

Reading this one as well - another film I haven't seen.

I like the project header on the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe film Entry, so you could copy it across to here. smiley - ok

"They rendezvous with Caspian at Aslan's How, the site of the Stone Table." - you need to say a little more about the Stone Table here.

They built a tunnel on the beach and then decided it didn't look like a rural train station?

"The lower third of the imposing castle walls were actually built " - does this mean the upper two thirds were not built?

The footnote about the secret treasury might sit better on the mention of the treasury...

"he envisioned Narnia to have a British climate rather than a cockroach-infested one" - what does this mean? In the 1950s the two categories were far from mutually exclusive, much to my mum's dismay...

I like the ending, but if you could tweak it so that 'cuddliest character' are the last words, that would make an excellent ending! Reepicheep is a memorable character indeed smiley - mouse

smiley - ok


A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Post 3

Bluebottle

Thanks for your comments. I've made some adjustments to explain more about the Stone Table.

The beach contains Cathedral Cove, a natural tunnel which was ideal to film in and have the cast emerge from and step onto New Zealand's natural beach. Leaving London's Underground tunnel and then being transported into a cave with a bright, shining natural landscape a step away works beautifully.

Britain isn't cockroach-infested as a whole, although there are local areas filled with cockroaches. If there have been some cockroaches in Britain since the 1950s and the cockroaches bred like cockroaches, then they'd be common everywhere by now. After all, it only took 70 years for rabbits to overrun Australia. The fact that cockroaches are still comparatively rare in Britain conclusively proves that cockroaches do not breed like cockroaches.

I don't remember seeing any cockroaches outside zoos. The invasive insect pest I remember growing up was the Colorado Beetle. There is a lovely story which said that the reason why the Colorado Beetle came to the Isle of Wight was because Hitler tried to attack the Island with 'Beetle bombs' – little cardboard gliders dropped from bombers designed to transport the beetles to the Island where they would eat their way out and then decimate the Island's crops, which if successful would eventually lead to widespread starvation in England following further raids. If you do a search for 'Colorado Beetle bomb Wight' on the internet you get a good crop of conspiracy theories about it, most concluding it was conceivable but unlikely.

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A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Post 4

Bluebottle

Tweaked.smiley - ok

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A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Post 5

SashaQ - happysad

https://www.rentokil.co.uk/cockroaches/ Pest control helps, but they do prefer certain environments over others and mainly emerge at night. Given a good home, though (like my mum's old kitchen), they can breed like cockroaches - one cockroach could result in thousands within a year. Given that CS Lewis mentioned cockroaches, it does make me think it is likely that he had personal experience of them at home, too, as they can live in Oxford... http://www.oxfordmail.co.uk/news/8096906.Cockroach_find_closes_Oxford_restaurant/

Fascinating about invasive species, though - just yesterday I saw and reported a Harlequin Ladybird, and that is interesting about the Colorado Beetle. I hope you didn't see many on the Isle of Wight, as I see they do more than *just* spread disease...


A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Post 6

Bluebottle

The point is that CS Lewis didn't mention cockroaches, they were added to the film to Americanise it. So while cockroaches can thrive indoors in the UK, only one species can survive outside in the wild in the UK, which is why they're not common in the UK overall (although yes, I take your point that they can congregate in vast numbers in small areas).

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A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Post 7

SashaQ - happysad

"The point is that CS Lewis didn't mention cockroaches, they were added to the film to Americanise it."

Ah smiley - eureka You need to say that, then - I very much did not know that that was what you meant...

The Oriental and German varieties may not live long outside in cooler climates, but they certainly find ways to move from one indoor location to another, given that they can be found across the UK from Liverpool to Oxford...


A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

Post 8

Bluebottle

I've clarified that now.smiley - ok

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Peer Review: A87906379 - 'The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian' - the Film

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