A Conversation for Peer Review

A88043123 - 'Oz' Film Adaptations

Post 1

Bluebottle

Entry: 'Oz' Film Adaptations - A88043123
Author: Bluebottle - U43530

Inexplicably the words of the song aren't 'Somewhere over the Rainbow weigh a pie' but 'Somewhere over the Rainbow way up high'.

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A88043123 - 'Oz' Film Adaptations

Post 2

SashaQ - happysad

smiley - laughsmiley - ok

I like the opening quote, too! smiley - laugh

Very interesting - I have seen the 1939 classic, but am not familiar with these others. I'm surprised there wasn't an Entry about the 1939 version already, so you've filled a gap in the Guide here smiley - ok

Fascinating that the Patchwork Girl is played by Pierre Couderc and Ojo the Munchkin boy is played by Violet MacMillan. Is that more influence of pantomime, do you think?

"John Dough and the Cherub based on an Oz spin-off by Baum's book" - book?

"This story was reworked to become the second half of the following year's novel, The Scarecrow of Oz (1915)" - is the Oz Film Manufacturing Company something that was owned by Baum, so he was writing the scripts and then turning them into novels? Ah, I've just found the paragraph confirming the company was owned by Baum.

Did the tornado distract Miss Gulch from worrying about the dog, I wonder? Nasty use of asbestos, to turn it into snow smiley - yikes

"sweatshop, where sweat is manufactured to be sold" smiley - laugh What a pun!


A88043123 - 'Oz' Film Adaptations

Post 3

SashaQ - happysad

Well done for finding and watching all these films smiley - ok

Would you mind giving the Entry another quick readthrough to check for typos and things?

Do you think it would be a good idea to use what you have here on the 1939 film as the basis for a companion Entry to the 1925 film Entry? As the 1939 film has been so influential, it deserves an Entry in its own right as well smiley - rainbow

I didn't realise there had been a Muppet version! "a delightful reference in this film is when the Tin Thing asks the Wizard of Oz if he is related to Frank Oz" smiley - ok


A88043123 - 'Oz' Film Adaptations

Post 4

Bluebottle

Thanks for your read-through, I've made changes as appropriate. The biggest one was moving the Oz Film Manufacturing Company higher up and adding some more detail to show that Baum was indeed heavily influenced by Vaudeville, which is why you have men playing women and vice versa in his films.
Pantomime as we know it wasn't really around in the US at the time, but his films definitely include pantomime cows and pantomime mules - I tried to see if there was a US name for pantomime cow, but couldn't find one.

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A88043123 - 'Oz' Film Adaptations

Post 5

Bluebottle

Oh, and I've made the 1939 section shorter too and will move some of it into a separate entry (but cannot assume that someone who reads that will also read this or vice versa)

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A88043123 - 'Oz' Film Adaptations

Post 6

SashaQ - happysad

Brilliant - thank you smiley - ok

Ah, yes Vaudeville smiley - ok

A couple of typos in the Rainbow Road to Oz section - Davy Crocket --> Crockett and live-actin --> live-action.

Wow, I didn't know anything about The Wiz (1978), so this is informative... At first glance, 'positive discrimination' and 'blaxploitation' seem to be contradictions in terms - maybe a bit more explanation that could be added? "the racist crows" - does that sound like "the crows are racist", rather than "the crows are racist stereotypes"?

"lobotomise her by zapping hundreds of volts through her head in an experimental electrotherapy treatment." - is the treatment designed to lobotomise, or actually to damage her whole brain more generally?

"This adaptation is closer to the original novel, combining the Munchkins – now all rats, who as in the novel exclusively wear blue – with the Field Mice who rescue Dorothy and the Lion from the sleepy poppies." - not sure I follow this, sorry - in the original novel the Munchkins are field mice?

"Still a womaniser at heart, Theordora falls in love" - Oz falls in love with Theodora

"a wise, overweight owl who cannot fly" - just to check, the plot specifically mentions the owl can't fly because of being overweight, is that right? (not just that the owl can't fly and happens to be overweight)

I saw a screenshot of that film - cheap-looking animation indeed... I like the ending of the Entry - a fascinating Raspberry record smiley - laugh


A88043123 - 'Oz' Film Adaptations

Post 7

Bluebottle

Thanks for reading through and your comments, I have made lots of tweaks to hopefully explain those areas more fully. There are a couple of points I'll comment further on here:

'Lobotomy' is one of those words with a very specific medical meaning as well as a generalised term for someone who has undergone a procedure that has resulted in the loss of brain function and individuality. There were a lot of documentaries last year at the time of the 75th anniversary of the first lobotomy. While this is fictional and the details of the medical procedure not discussed, and in surgical terms a 'lobotomy' uses 'needles' to sever connections between the frontal lobes and the brain and not electricity, the procedure's aims in this film is consistent with the stated aims of lobotomies, which is to prevent nightmares, aiding the patient (in this case Dorothy) in being able to tell fact from fiction and by making her more compliant, means she won't have to spend her life locked up in an institution.


smiley - modjust to check, the plot specifically mentions the owl can't fly because of being overweight, is that right?
– I'd say that the plot specifically mentions that the Chekhov's owl can't fly not only as an excuse to include some unfunny fat jokes but also to make his flying at the end of the film at a time when it is narratively imperative he do so in order to save the day an almost dramatic moment.

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