A Conversation for Peer Review

A88031216 - An Introduction to Crochet

Post 1

SashaQ - happysad

Entry: An Introduction to Crochet - A88031216
Author: SashaQ - happysad - U9936370

Here's a little Entry I was inspired to write today, to fill a gap in the Edited Guide smiley - biggrin


A88031216 - An Introduction to Crochet

Post 2

You can call me TC

Well done. And well done for not trying to explain how to do it, impossible without pictures and, as you say, adequately demonstrated all over the web.

I first learnt using very fine thread and making lacy things such as cheval sets (three decorative mats which you put on a dressing table to protect it from scratching the surface when putting your hairbrush, mirror, compact etc down). Nowadays I like to run off dolls' clothes for my granddaughters, but using normal DK wool, not fine Cotton!

One kind of crochet not mentioned is Tunisian crochet which is a cross between knitting and crochet as you work a whole row with the hook inside the loops.


A88031216 - An Introduction to Crochet

Post 3

SashaQ - happysad

Thanks TC smiley - biggrin

I'm impressed you learned by making fine lacy things! My grandmother taught me, and we used DK wool - much easier to see what we were doing smiley - ok

I hadn't heard of Tunisian Crochet - thanks for mentioning it smiley - ok I added a footnote.


A88031216 - An Introduction to Crochet

Post 4

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

I remember learning how to crochet (and knit) as a child, but I can't remember who taught me. smiley - yikes It wasn't my mother, and I don't think we were taught how to do it in school either. We definitely had sewing classes (which I didn't like). I knitted and crocheted all my baby clothes and blankets. I once made a cheval set, I still have it somewhere. I also created a pansy from the same instruction book, but it was very fiddly. My arthritic fingers don't allow me to use knitting needles now, but I can hand sew facemasks, although my terribly-poor eyesight causes problems when trying to thread sewing needlessmiley - bruised

I didn't know that Queen Victoria learned to crochet, smiley - cheers great little nugget. Love your crochet octopus photosmiley - love

GB
smiley - galaxysmiley - cdouble


A88031216 - An Introduction to Crochet

Post 5

SashaQ - happysad

Thank you smiley - biggrin

Yes, crafts are very comforting, but not easy on the hands and eyes. smiley - hug I don't have the most professional knitting technique, but I find it OK. However, when I crochet the Octopus for a Preemie, I end up with the crochet hook handle embedded in my thumb as the tension has to be so tight, so I have to limit the amount of time I spend on those.


A88031216 - An Introduction to Crochet

Post 6

You can call me TC

The latest trend which you could also mention is amigurumi, which I have done before but didn't call it that. Basically, its crocheted miniatures - mainly animals, but you can kit out an entire dolls' house with tables, chairs and washing machine as well as little people if you like.

Very pleasing to do and quick satisfaction because they're so small.


A88031216 - An Introduction to Crochet

Post 7

SashaQ - happysad

Thanks TC - yes, I mention Amigurumi smiley - ok I made a bunny a while ago, as well as the Octopus for a Preemie comforters, but that is skill to make dolls' house items!


A88031216 - An Introduction to Crochet

Post 8

You can call me TC

Oh sorry, so you do. I didn't re-read before I wrote that. Maybe you could give a small mention to Pinterest and Ravelry - two websites which have patterns and ideas to set readers on their way if their interest has been peaked by the entry.


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