A Conversation for Peer Review

A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 1

almoner99

Entry: Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten - A87906081
Author: almoner99 - U15002866

Written by someone involved in the damp proofing and timber treatment industry as a small guide to those who are not. The entry is not exhaustive or excessively detailed, nor is it designed to be a DIY guide.


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 2

SashaQ - happysad - Editor

Hello almoner99 and welcome to Peer Review!

Thank you for writing this excellent Entry - just what we need in the Guide, as it is concise, informative and contains a goodly dose of humour!

I've heard of dry rot, but didn't know much about it, so I appreciate your guide to the 'mushroom ninja' smiley - ok

One question I did have was about "although dry rot is a "brown rot", not all brown rots are dry rot" - could you say a little bit about what else might appear?

smiley - ok


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 3

Bluebottle

Welcome to h2g2 - this does indeed seem a very interesting and welcome entry.

Can I ask where you've mentioned that it affects masonry, do you mean it attacks the masonry itself (bricks and stone), plaster and/or mortar on the masonry, or does its spores lie dormant in masonry to later infect timber?

I thought it was a problem just for wooden houses, but obviously not.

<BB<


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 4

Florida Sailor Getting Ready to Visit Havana, Cuba

My biggest contact with dry-rot has been with wooden boats. This seems to be a bit of a contradiction as boats usually live in the water and tend to be a bit damp. As the Entry says it is just a form of 'brown rot' The old adage was to remove the affected wood, take it to a safe place and burn it!

Just another thought for the Entrysmiley - biggrin

F smiley - dolphin S


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 5

almoner99

Basically, anything that is not a brown rot is a white rot, and anything other than dry rot is a wet rot! Confused yet?

Brown rots are so named after the cubing and dessicating effect they have on timber, but only dry rot propagates itself and can survive after the source of moisture is removed, as it seems to create its own.


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 6

almoner99

We have quite a few houses in the UK built using lime mortars to hold the masonry together. It tends to be softer, and doesn't contain harsh alkaline Portland Cement (as a rule). It is also quite prous, and allows the building to 'breathe'. Pre-Victorian bricks were also generally hand made, sometimes from poor quality materials, and can be highly porous. It is the capillaries in the bricks and mortar that the fungus exploits, using the moisture in the substrate (and possibly some nutrients, but nobody is quite sure about that yet.

Also bear in mind that these older buildings are not of a cavity construction, but often 9" solid brick, or thicker.


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 7

Bluebottle

Are you still around, Almoner99?

<BB<


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 8

almoner99

Yes, thank you. Still here, but not every day (frankly, I forgot to check back whilst I was on holiday).


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 9

Bluebottle

That's okay – you don't have to be here every day, just wanted to make sure you've not left. smiley - biggrin
I'm still hoping to read what you'll write about next.smiley - ok

<BB<


A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

Post 10

almoner99

Watch this space - I may be planning an article on the importance (or not) of having a hump...!


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A87906081 - Dry Rot, or how not to have your house eaten

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