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A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 1

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

Entry: The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art - A87893220
Author: Galaxy Babe - heartbroken editor - U128652

I found this A567551 while searching for something else, so I have added to it, see what you think smiley - artist

GB
smiley - galaxysmiley - biro


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 2

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

I think this is a really good start but it still seems unfinished to me. I'm not sure what is missing yet but I'll think about it.


... I remember that I once painted the Mona Lisa without Mona Lisa at school, by the way (the picture only showed the background, filling gaps where Mona Lisa usually stands).


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 3

Bluebottle

Yesterday Mona Lisa was featured on the new episode of 'Horrible Histories':
http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbbc/watch/horrible-histories-mona-lisa-shares-her-story

I also learnt that teeth were once considered rude? In the 15th Century across Europe, teeth were not shown in paintings - even when they had their mouths open – unless you were painting the dead or a base person who had devoted their lives to carnal pleasures.smiley - shrug

<BB<


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 4

Bluebottle

A view that was still held in polite society in 1703, according to John Baptist de La Salle's 'Les Règles de la Bienséance et de la Civilité chrétienne, à l'usage des Écoles chrétiennes' (The Rules of Christian Decorum and Civility):

There are some people who raise their upper lip so high or
let the lower lip sag so much that their teeth are almost entirely
visible. This is entirely contrary to decorum, which forbids you to
allow your teeth to be uncovered, for nature gave us lips to conceal
them.

<BB<


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 5

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

That's great BB, I have added that info and added you to the author listing as it's already a collaborate entrysmiley - ta

Tav, I am grateful for your input knowing your artistic background and will add anything you can think of to finish off this entrysmiley - ok

GB
smiley - galaxysmiley - artist


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 6

Bluebottle

(The Mona Lisa always reminds me of 'Bernard and the Genie' smiley - artist)

<BB<


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 7

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

smiley - ok I'll think about it
Don't have any sources at hand at the moment.

One of my favourite versions of the Mona Lisa is the Mona Ogg by Leonard da Quirm by the way (well, actually Paul Kidby).

And I would guess not showing your teeth was caused by the lack of dental hygiene.smiley - yuk


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 8

Bluebottle

That may have been part of the reason, however when Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun exhibited her painting 'Self-Portrait with Daughter' in 1784 French society was scandalised as she was the first artist to show teeth. Bare breasts and general lack of clothing is perfectly acceptable, obviously, but teeth? Sacre bleu!

Her painting was reviewed with the words,
'An affectation which artists, art lovers and persons of taste have been united in condemning and which finds no precedent among the ancients, is that in smiling she shows her teeth. This affectation is particularly out of place in a mother.'

This was 60 years after the beginning of modern dentistry. (The Father of Dentistry is said to be Pierre Fauchard, who published 'Le Chirurgien Dentiste' (The Surgeon Dentist) in 1728)

<BB<


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 9

SashaQ - happysad - Editor

This subject will be an excellent addition to the Edited Guide - well found GB! smiley - biggrin

I wonder if the Entry is missing a bit more discussion of her smile, as it is something that has been analysed in particular depth (one theory I learned of was that the smile might have appeared as the painting deteriorated over the centuries!)

I like the heading "Wherefore Art Thou?", but sadly, if I recall my English lessons correctly, I think it means "Why are you?" not where...

The Doctor Who section is very good smiley - laugh

Excellent way to end the Entry, with the quote from the song smiley - artistsmiley - love


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 10

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

Hiya Tav I have added your Mona Ogg, please check I have interpreted it correctlysmiley - ta

Thanks Sashasmiley - ok
Yes I think there's a whole section can be added about the Mona Lisa smile. It'll have to be later, though as I have had a call to attend my mothersmiley - run

GB
smiley - galaxysmiley - artist


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 11

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

smiley - ok There are actually two versions of the Mona Ogg, or rather three. One is on the cover of the book, a second version looking like a pencil sketch shows the same picture. You may want to mention that she is grinning widely (as far as I remember Nanny had an affair with Leonard da Quirm?). THere is another pencil sketch drawing showing Nanny Ogg as we know her (an old woman) in the same pose with the same background holding Greebo on her arm. Also the beer jug is missing... she probably drank all of it already smiley - winkeye


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 12

Bluebottle

You can add a link to A912593 on Paul Kidby - in fact, you can see the Mona Ogg cover at the bottom of that page.

<BB<


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 13

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

smiley - ok

I have updatedsmiley - biro


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 14

Dmitri Gheorgheni

This is lots of fun! smiley - biggrin


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 15

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

I think that as you only have 1 sentence about Discworld the title of the section is probably not right, especially as the 2nd sentence has nothing to do with it.

Basically the Mona Lisa has been photoshopped, repainted and her head replaced with different people probably millions of times. I know for instance that there is also a Mr Bean version and Disney versions with for instance Daisy Duck.

There are also some pictures done by actual artists with references on the Mona Lisa.


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 16

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Like Marcel Duchamp. smiley - laugh

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L.H.O.O.Q.


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 17

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

smiley - ta

Updatedsmiley - biro

GB
smiley - galaxysmiley - artist


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 18

SashaQ - happysad - Editor

Excellent updates smiley - ok

I'm pleased to see mention of the Mona Lisa Smile film - I enjoyed that in the cinema.

Excellent mention of the possibility that Leonardo used himself as a model for the painting smiley - ok

"a visit will be more of a symbolic pilgrimage than a good chance to enjoy the painting" - well said indeed. It made an impression on me when I saw it in real life, but only in the sense that it was smaller than I had expected, and surprisingly difficult to see anything else about it because of the crowd and the protections...

smiley - ok


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 19

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

Thank you! smiley - ok

I haven't seen Mona Lisa Smile but I will watch it next time it's on tv!

Those were IanG's words, I haven't seen her myself, nor have I even been to Francesmiley - ermit's on my Bucket List though!


A87893220 - The Mona Lisa - an Enigmatic Work of Art

Post 20

bobstafford

You will enjoy the visit dont leave it to long smiley - biggrin


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