A Conversation for Peer Review

A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 1

Bluebottle

Entry: 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama - A87885788
Author: Bluebottle - U43530

If you only read one of my entries this month, read A87871657 - 'Star Wars' Animated Adventures. If you read two, you may as well consider reading this one too, which was written to coincide with Create's current 'False Facts' and Fake News theme: A87885661. This examines how factual a television drama based on real events is.

Everything in this entry is true, however I admit that in keeping with the 'False Facts' theme I did choose to give at least one fact an, shall we say, interesting interpretation? Let me know if you think you've spotted it.

<BB<


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 2

SashaQ - happysad - Editor

What a tale smiley - sadface I like the respectful humour you've added, though - Liverpool v Everton indeed...

I did have a bit of confusion at the mentions of Rubenhold - her name is mentioned after a quote by Dormer, and then later it sounds like the Review was by Jane Austen!

Robert predeceased Seymour by a decade rather than Jane?

The woman isn't in the bath at the trial, I presume...

Is the interesting interpretation something to do with George Washington and the trees?


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 3

Dmitri Gheorgheni

smiley - rofl George Washington and the cherry tree is a myth, so that fits right in.

Brilliant story! I didn't know about this. smiley - wow What a fun read, and it really fits the topic.

'...a talented poet in her own write...'

Could you either put 'in her own write' in quotes, or add something to the effect of 'as John Lennon might have said'? Otherwise, it just looks misspelled.


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 4

Bluebottle

Thanks for the comments smiley - biggrin I've reworded bits so hopefully they are smoother to read now.

And now – the interesting interpretation wasn't to do with Washington. I did know the cherry is apocryphal – I have seen Peabody & Mr Sherman you know – but couldn't resist. The most famous axeman in history remains Dr Beeching smiley - tongueout Did you know that one of the Worsley's nearest neighbours was John Wilkes?

You've spotted my cunning plan to get the Isle of Wight and a Beatles reference in all my entries. You're right that 'in her own write' didn't really work out so I'll have to tweak a bit somewhere else to make it sneakily Beatley.

I suspect the sad truth is that if someone was to make a Hillsborough drama that was profoundly respectful, moving, incredibly well-acted and presented the real, human tragedy of the event in the most emotionally profound way - but the characters were seen wearing the wrong shirts, that's all that a lot of people would care about. It seems so trivial in comparison. Will anyone really care about the shirt colour in 300 years time? Or 3,000?

I was unsure whether to include the sexual slang. Is it me, or does 'play rantum scantum' seem a charming phrase? It sounds like a bit like a Parlour Game popular during the Victorian Autumn – let's being with an invigorated round of the Minister's Cat or Blind Man's Bluff, we'll play rantum scantum and then go apple bobbing. Sounds so innocent.

I did think about whether a word or phrase is inherently and eternally unacceptable or does its shock value diminish over time if not in use? In the drama the bathing woman calls Bisset a 'mutton-monger', leading to shocked and aghast expressions on all present. Is this just over-reaction on the actors and extras' parts? Or is it merely a natural part of society moving and changing, in which things previously acceptable are no longer and what was unacceptable is now often indeed encouraged.

<BB<


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 5

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Oh, I'm all for including the antiquated cuss words! smiley - rofl It's true - what scandalised once, is now quaint and cute. And much less awful than the stuff Tim Roth said in 'Rob Roy'. (They tried too hard to make sure you knew the macaronis were metrosexual rather than gay.)





A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 6

bobstafford

Have you come across the term "old bat" and its origin


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 7

Bluebottle

Let me guess - it originally meant an elderly prostitute? Am I right?

<BB<


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 8

bobstafford

Correct 90%
Specifically a night trading prostitute circa 1650ad



smiley - cheers


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 9

Bluebottle

You learn something new every day.

<BB<


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 10

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Why is this entry still sitting in PR?

Is it because we discussed shocking topics? smiley - winkeye


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 11

Bluebottle

smiley - shrugThere are some entries of mine that I don't mind if they sink to the bottom of Peer Review and hang around for a few years, but I liked this one.

<BB<


A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Post 12

Dmitri Gheorgheni

*waves at passing Scouts*


Key: Complain about this post

A87885788 - 'The Scandalous Lady W' - the BBC Drama

Write an Entry

"The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is a wholly remarkable book. It has been compiled and recompiled many times and under many different editorships. It contains contributions from countless numbers of travellers and researchers."

Write an entry
Read more