A Conversation for Ask h2g2

People who know what they want for lunch

Post 41

Orcus

As I said, lucky you - some of us have jobs that take up that time anyway, without any travelling involved, plus weekends.

I must resign one day


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 42

paulh. Everyone is a critic!

I live where I do because it's about two miles where I used to work. Not a bad walk, except that the distance between is a heavily-traveled highway. Fumes from the passing trucks can make you doubt whether it's fresh air you're getting. smiley - yuk


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 43

Rev Nick - dead man walking (mostly)

I have desks twice, maybe 2 years the first time and about 3 years the other. I never had an office or even a 'personal' cubicle. All the rest of my work years, I had a work bench or 3 - usually occupied by tools, test equipment and things in some state of disassembly and repair. Eating at any of them was easy enough, but most places would have me walking 5 to 20 miles each way to meet a physically demanding work-day.


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 44

You can call me TC

I always cycled to work. Not any more - yay!

Like Incognitas I plan our food for the week ahead so I never have to make any decisions at short notice.

As to eating out:

On my first (and last) visit to a Subway, I was guided by my youngest son who warned me in advance what and how to order. Hate the smell of those places, so shan't be going there again.

And to answer Winnoch's original question - no, I never dither. In a restaurant, I sit down, open the menu, choose what I want (the first think on the menu that is something I like - don't read any further than that), then close the menu and chat to everyone else. This must annoy people as they are still trying to read the entire menu and decide what they want. Men usually take ages.

At a self-service restaurant, sandwich bar or whatever, I don't queue up till I've scanned the menu and made a choice. The only hold-up is when the staff don't understand me, or can't hear my little voice, which is every time.

I don't like keeping people waiting. (Says Miss Unpunctuality!)


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 45

Caiman raptor elk - Infinity lies outside the box

I once tried to go to work by bike, but found out I didn't have any energy left for the actual work and the return journey. (due to the distance involved)

The contents of my sandwiches is purely based on whatever is available at the time / what the kid don't eat.


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 46

Rev Nick - dead man walking (mostly)

In 1995, I had the good intentions of biking to work in fair seasons - it was only about 5 km to go.

How-ever, the humidity here in the summer is suffocating, I would arrive at work more wet (in my military work attire) than if I had just stepped out of a shower. Also, the activation of a new composting facility added a whole new 'aroma' to the idea. Think of a sewage treatment plant . . .


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 47

Orcus

Well that's why people where lycra - it wicks away sweat and you can always change when you get to work (well that's one of the reasons) - though admittedly showering and proper changing rooms - or the lack thereof - put many off.


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 48

Orcus

Both of the last posts do have me urging to point out that if keep doing it you get fitter! That fatigue passes after a while - and you can always do it in stages at first.

Easy to find reason not to do something.

The humidity in East Coast US is pretty bad mind, I have experienced that. I recall my first experience was as a child in Washington DC and other nearby areas in New England, my mother dissing people in the US for using tumble driers when the weather was hot! Why not hang it all out on a line to dry....? She then tried it.... smiley - rofl


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 49

Orcus

(I am a bit of a cycling freak I know, sorry)


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 50

The Left Reverend Doktor Baron Grim

"The humidity in East Coast US is pretty bad mind,"...


smiley - bigeyes...

smiley - rofl



Sorry, I couldn't help but laugh from here on the Texas Gulf Coast where 70-100% humidity is the norm and we're already into the 80°s today... in April.


I rode to work, 10 miles, twice. Lycra wouldn't be able to handle the swamp sweat dripping off of me if it had been in the Summer.


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 51

Bluebottle

The funny thing is that now I always feel tired if I don't cycle to work – cycling wakes you up in ways that using public transport smiley - bus never cansmiley - yawnsmiley - zzz.

<BB<


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 52

Orcus

>>I rode to work, 10 miles, twice. Lycra wouldn't be able to handle the swamp sweat dripping off of me if it had been in the Summer.<<

Well I said it is one of the reasons- so you can wear something other than your work clothes when doing it is one of the others.

When I was in Washington DC it was near 100% humidity nearly the whole time.. Can it be worse than that?


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 53

paulh. Everyone is a critic!

November through April are not very humid there, according to this link:

http://www.rarefindnursery.com/index.php/rosa-virginiana-1-gal-pot.html

What made me laugh was the remark that less snow falls in July than in any other month. smiley - laugh


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 54

The Left Reverend Doktor Baron Grim

Heh... I think your clipboard was confussed. smiley - winkeyesmiley - rose


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 55

Orcus

>What made me laugh was the remark that less snow falls in July than in any other month. laugh <

Little gems like that are always worthy of a smiley - laugh

I should probably not regard my week in DC in June/July 1980 as representative.

Got to admit I was also in Philadelphia in 2008 and it was just dry heat there right enough. I expect the Gulf of Mexico, what with it being in the actual tropics is probably more often humid smiley - smiley. Never thought of Texas like that to be honest - always kind of see it as desert. Anyone would think it was half the size of Western Europe on its own and probably has a varied climate smiley - winkeye


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 56

paulh. Everyone is a critic!

The eastern quarter of Texas seems to have roughly the same climate as Louisiana. West of that area, it gets much drier.


People who know what they want for lunch

Post 57

The Left Reverend Doktor Baron Grim

Depending on who you ask, Texas has between 4 and 7ish climate/geological zones. I'm on the coastal flood plains. North and East of Houston/Galveston are the Piney Woods. Around Austin is the Hill Country. It's drier than areas East of there but not as dry as the Big Bend area West of Austin or the Llano Estacado ("staked plains") in the panhandle around Amarillo. The Dallas area is prairies and lakes (all but arguably one lake in Texas are artificial). And then there are the dry, mesquite speckled plains in South Texas.


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