A Conversation for Ask h2g2

Petty Hates

Post 4861

Mr. X ---> I spent a year dead for tax purposes. It worked so well that I'm going to do it again.

Puny, pathetic, weakling sneezes. And when Americans spell "theater" as "theatre".

smiley - pirate


Petty Hates

Post 4862

Mr. X ---> I spent a year dead for tax purposes. It worked so well that I'm going to do it again.

And also, when commas are, put in the, wrong places.

smiley - pirate


Petty Hates

Post 4863

Bright Blue Shorts

Comma's denote pauses.

How can one be sure that the author wouldn't like the reader to say it in the manner of James, T, Kirk, Captain, of the, Starship, Ent-er-prise? smiley - winkeye


Petty Hates

Post 4864

Sho - gainfully employed again

Because. They. Would. Use. Full. Stops.
smiley - magic


Petty Hates

Post 4865

The Groob

Just singed up to Yahoo Answers and immediately closed my account.

On signing up, it didn't make it clear what information would be available online for others to see. Online privacy is very important to me. Many websites are like this; I do not know what a shaded box means by default - nor would anyone new to the internet.

They clearly had no interest in allowing me to participate quickly (instant gratification) because they were too busy trying to get me to use every Yahoo feature under the sun.

I couldn't read their Captchas.

They didn't make it easy to close my account. If any website makes it difficult for me to close an account I will close my account.

It wasn't easy to find help information about closing an account, and when I did find the page the link provided to the 'close account' page didn't work.


Petty Hates

Post 4866

Bright Blue Shorts

Shop assistants (usually young males) who call me "Mate" ... grrr


Petty Hates

Post 4867

Elentari

"And when Americans spell "theater" as "theatre"."

That's the other way around, surely?

On a related note, I hate it when people pronounce 'theatre' as 'theeayter'. smiley - grr


Petty Hates

Post 4868

TRiG (Ireland) A dog, so bade in office

Americans usually spell /re/ words as /er/, but some make an exception for /theatre/, probably in an attempt to sound sophisticated. It doesn't annoy me, but I can understand why it would some people.

TRiG.smiley - biggrin


Petty Hates

Post 4869

Malabarista - now with added pony

It's like words spelled with a "Z" in German - Zirkus, Zigarette - are sometimes spelled with a "C" instead to sound "posh".


Petty Hates

Post 4870

Rod

Prats in car parks who put their foot down & zoom past me when I'm halfway reversed out.


Petty Hates

Post 4871

Elentari

I was driving home from a restaurant the other night, and in the space of about 20 minutes three different drivers performed dangerous manouevers when I was too close to them.

I got overtaken twice when I was doing the speed limit, which is incredibly irritating. But I refuse to speed up if I'm doing the limit and someone is stuck close behind me.


Petty Hates

Post 4872

Bright Blue Shorts

"refuse to speed up if I'm doing the limit and someone is stuck close behind me."

I always feel it's safest just to slow up a little bit at times like those ... go extra slow to be extra safe smiley - winkeye


Petty Hates

Post 4873

Mr. X ---> I spent a year dead for tax purposes. It worked so well that I'm going to do it again.

Ditto.


"And when Americans spell "theater" as "theatre"."
~*~That's the other way around, surely?~*~

No, see, /I'm/ an American. And the American spelling is /supposed/ to be "theater", which just makes sense to me, because then it's phonetic. But for some incomprehensible reason, every single member of the theater department insists on using the British spelling of "theatre" despite the fact that we're /in/ America, and they /are/ Americans. As someone else said, it's probably to seem more "sophisticated". But I hate that too, because it seems to me like you should just be forthright and straightforward, rather than putting on false pretense.

Of course, I don't mind if it's a Brit doing it, because that /is,/ after all, the official British spelling. (Mind you, I still prefer American spellings over British spellings, with the exception of "doughnut", just because they /are/ more phonetic.)

smiley - pirate


Petty Hates

Post 4874

pocketprincess

They're not always phonetic though: Arkansas

so why with some stuff and not others? That's why I don't understand!


Petty Hates

Post 4875

Yvonne aka india

People from Kansas, pronounced as it's written, become Kansans, an obvious plural. From what I understand people from Arkansas pronounced Ark-can-saw become Arkansans, like Kansas just with the Ark- on the front. However I have also heard of "Arkansawyer" which would be more phoenitcally simple. Is that right, or have I been listening to the wrong people?


Petty Hates

Post 4876

pocketprincess

It would be more simple if Arkansas was spelt Arkansaw, it would also mean Americans could justifiably claim that they spell English phonetically, really there's just a couple of things that they spell phonetically which Anglophones on this side of the Atlantic don't but both are guilty of spelling things weirdly


Petty Hates

Post 4877

van-smeiter

Too right. I've heard smiley - dogs bark in Berkshire but I've never heard them berk!

My current petty hate is forgetting to middle-click to open links in a new tab; habit still makes me left-click smiley - grr


Petty Hates

Post 4878

Malabarista - now with added pony

Greengrocer's apostrophes in *GERMAN* - we don't even have possessive ones, so why do they use them to make plurals? smiley - wah


Petty Hates

Post 4879

Mr. X ---> I spent a year dead for tax purposes. It worked so well that I'm going to do it again.

Many U.S. states are named after Indian tribes.

~*~The name Arkansas derives from the same root as the name for the State of Kansas. The Kansas tribe of American Indians are closely associated with the Sioux tribes. The word is a French pronunciation of a Quapaw (a related "Kaw" tribe) word meaning "land of downriver people" or "people of the south wind". The pronunciation of Arkansas (ar-kan-saw) was made official by an act of the state legislature in 1881 after a dispute between the two U.S. Senators from Arkansas. One wanted to pronounce the name ar-kán-sas and the other wanted ár-kan-saw.~*~


Besides, I said more phonetic, not universally phonetic. The word "phonetic" alone being an obvious example.

smiley - pirate


Petty Hates

Post 4880

Miz307

Que hoppers smiley - grr


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