A Conversation for Ask h2g2

(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5101

house_in_the_country

Thanks for His Dark Materials comments. I'm looking forward to reading the books.


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5102

Sho - gainfully employed again

I'm quite jealous of you getting to read them for the first time! The nearest I'll get to that is reading them to The Gruesome Twosome.

have fun


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5103

Lochangel

I really enjoyed The Curious incident... although it was an uncomfortable read. Working at the time with at least one autistic person, it explained a lot and showed up my lack of empathy.


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5104

Lucky Llareggub - no more cannibals in our village, we ate the last one yesterday..

I too enjoyed 'The Curious Incident'. I felt that it was an insightful and sympathetic little story written in a mysterious Roald Dahl kind of way, with great skill from the teenage hero's point of view.


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5105

Edward the Bonobo - Gone.

Jarhead is rather good, in its way...but I did find I'd got the point about 1/3 of the way in.

Black Swan Green by David Mitchell is in a similar vein to 'The Curious...' - life observed by a teenager (in this case, not one with Aspergers or anything). It's quite insightful on human relationships.


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5106

Lucky Llareggub - no more cannibals in our village, we ate the last one yesterday..

The points I've got so far from 'Jarhead' is that being a Gulf War marine sniper involves consuming a lot of alcohol, watching a lot of blue movies, doing a lot of keep fit; and of course sleeping with your gun.
Contracting a sexual disease is not a problem in Saudi Arabia where tarts are a bit thin on the ground.
The only people the US marines have shot so far - themselves - a few suicide cases. I'm about halfway through.


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5107

Sho - gainfully employed again

but isn't that the point of Jarhead - that basically the job they have is "hurry up and wait"


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5108

Spaceechik, Typomancer

I haven't been able to get a copy of "Curious Incident..."; it's always out at my library. I 'm going to have to reserve it.

I'm reading a pretty interesting book right now -- "What is Your Dangerous Idea?", edited by John Brockman. It's from a group of people who write for a foundation called the Edge (www dot edge dot org). People like Steven Pinker, Freeman Dyson, Daniel Dennet, Richard Dawkins, Robert Zimbardo (remember his famous Stanford experiment, which explored the guard/prisoner dynamic, in the sixties?) and Jared Diamond. Fascinating group of people, anyway.

They do essays on a question each year, last year's was "What Do You Believe that You Can't Prove?" The book from this year's question asks why we are so reluctant to even discuss some ideas, and why are we so afraid of them? Very cool, so far, and I'm barely out of the introduction!


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5109

pedro

What is Your Dangerous Idea? sounds like an interesting book.

At the mo, I've just finished 'The Revenge of Gaia', by James Lovelock. It's very interesting, deeply scary, and quite badly written. As a polemic about how we're destroying the mechanisms which keep the globe in a state suitable for us, and how *we* will inevitably pay the price for it, it's unfocussed, rambling, and doesn't present a clear mechanism (for the most part) of how this will happen.

I couldn't help but think throughout most of the book, that if Richard Dawkins had written it, with his laser-like clarity and focus, this book would still be on the bestseller lists and would be the most talked about book of the decade. It's really a missed opportunity.smiley - erm

I'm also halfway through 'The Costs of Economic Growth' by EJ Mishan, an economist. It's quite a serious book, although it doesn't require specialist economic knowledge. It does what it says on the tin. Increased GDP is *not* a true sign of growing wealth, and wealth is just a proxy for welfare in any case. Much of the economic growth around at the moment may actually reduce welfare, and if that's the case, WTF are we trying to increase GDP for?

And I've picked up Christopher Brookmyre's 'A Tale Etched in Blood and Hard Black Pencil', for some light reading. Comedy Tartan Noir, for those not in the know.smiley - smiley


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5110

kuzushi

Having read The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins, I'm now reading "Who moved the stone?" by Frank Morison (one 'r', one 's').


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5111

Edward the Bonobo - Gone.

He only skimmed it, folks. smiley - winkeye


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5112

kuzushi


I did not! smiley - winkeye


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5113

kuzushi


Ed Bono is going to read "Who moved the stone" in depth. smiley - smiley


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5114

Edward the Bonobo - Gone.

Er...maybe.


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5115

van-smeiter

GDP isn't agood indication of wealth, in the same way that average house prices and average wages are fairly meaningless. Median house prices and median wages are far more significant.

I'm *still* reading 'Grey Area & other stories' by Will Self and 'Man Walked Into a Pub' (A Sociable History of Beer) by Pete Brown- fascinating book and brilliantly written.

I think I posted before that most of my reading consists of textbooks about Health & Disease so I hardly read for pleasure these days smiley - sadface


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5116

Cheerful Dragon

Just packed my books for my holiday. They are Sharpe's Gold by Bernard Cornwell, The History of Mr. Polly by H. G. Wells, Samurai William by Giles Milton, Persian Fire by Tom Holland and The Year of Revolution by Tom Pakenham. Don't know how many of those I'll get through in 2 weeks, but Giles Milton is very readable and Sharpe won't take more than a couple of days.


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5117

Magwitch - My name is Mags and I am funky.

I bought 'The Door Into Summer' again this week (old copy has been snaffled the dust bunnies, or a friend smiley - silly) and have been reading that again. Good stuff. You can't beat a bit of SF at any timesmiley - magic


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5118

Researcher 8801587

A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking.

Rather good, but awfully complicated. Afraid he quite lost me at times, but he certainly seems to have grasped the first principles well.

Do you think I ought to give him a few hints?


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5119

cmfavre

I just started rereading this book. It doesnt matter how many time I read it I always am amazed at his wit and find a joke that I missed the last time. Ahhhh, it truly is a shame he wont be creating anymore masterpieces to share with the world.


(The Return of) What book are you reading at this time?

Post 5120

pedro

I've just finished the (very long-titled) Christopher Brookmyre novel I mentioned earlier. It was, really, surprisingly, good. It's partly a murder mystery thriller whose main characters all went to school together. This part is well-written, densely-plotted and with excellent dialogue, par for the course for Brookmyre, and with many a laugh.

What really distinguishes it though, are the parts devoted to the characters growing up at a Catholic school in Scotland in the 80s. The dialogue is exceptional (again), but the politics among the school children, from the first day of primary to the leaving do at the end of 5th year, is really superb. The jostling for position and status, the fights among the boys, the bitching among the girls, is so true to life it's uncanny. Being Brookmyre, these are interspersed with hilarious stories, which are far too funny to have happened in real life to one class in one school, but are all believable enough not to disturb the flow.

Plus, there's a glossary of Scottish slang at the end for all you foreigners. ('fud', see 'fanny'smiley - laugh)

I've read a few of his books, they're funny, have great, believable, Scottish dialogue, but this book goes a step further. The emotional depth is greater than his previous books, and, by Jove, it might even pass Ed's literature test.smiley - winkeye





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