A Conversation for Ask h2g2

Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2041

Sho - gainfully employed again

I had people giving me those funny looks on the tram when reading Who's Afraid of Beowulf by Tom Holt. And I also smiley - rofl at most of the Stephanie Plum novels by Janet Evanovich (One for the Money is the first one)


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2042

Blackberry Cat , if one wishes to remain an individual in the midst of the teeming multitudes, one must make oneself grotesque

I like Tom Holt especially his historical novels like 'Olympiad' or 'Alexander at the Worlds End', very funny very black humour


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2043

aka Bel - A87832164

What a funny coincidence - I've just returned from England, where the very sweet lady in a bookshop recommended Valhalla by Tom Holt - and I sat in the train to London, laughing whilst reading it - now I'm very curious of


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2044

aka Bel - A87832164

....his other books - no idea where that vanished smiley - weird


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2045

DA ; Simply Vicky: Don't get pithy with me!

I read 'Guns, Germs and Steel' in 2002, and I should read it again, it's quite complex...


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2046

Spaceechik, Typomancer

Barry said: " am a fan of American humorist Jean Shepherd. If you've seen "A Christmas Story" then you know what his writing is like (he wrote and narrated the movie)."

I love Jean Shepard! Did you ever see the film that was made of his story, "The Fourth of July"?

In the film, our young hero (the then so-hot Matt Dillon) finds out that on his blind date he had to be talked in to, for the first time in his life, HE is the "dog"! Also some really hilarious father-son observations; that movie (and the story it was made from) had me in stitches.

SC


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2047

Spaceechik, Typomancer

Sho said: "And I also at most of the Stephanie Plum novels by Janet Evanovich (One for the Money is the first one)"

That series of books is laugh out loud funny! They're so good, you don't care WHO is glaring at you!

However, steer clear of any of the "Full House" series stuff. Awful. Stupid characters and even more stilted situations are the trademark in those!

SC


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2048

Spaceechik, Typomancer

Tom Holt? What kind of books does he do? I'm assuming very tongue in cheek historical novels, if they can be described as "dark humor".

Something along the line of Terry Pratchett, maybe?

SC


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2049

Blackberry Cat , if one wishes to remain an individual in the midst of the teeming multitudes, one must make oneself grotesque

he has 2 main types
mythology and modern life mixed together like Valhalla, Whos Afraid of Beowulf, or Grailblazers
which are a good light read
or the historical novels set in ancient Greece which are well-researched and deal with some serious ideas but are also very funny


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2050

Barry (ask me about the Disneyland Resort)

SpaceCadette queried: "I love Jean Shepard! Did you ever see the film that was made of his story, "The Fourth of July"?

In the film, our young hero (the then so-hot Matt Dillon) finds out that on his blind date he had to be talked in to, for the first time in his life, HE is the "dog"! Also some really hilarious father-son observations; that movie (and the story it was made from) had me in stitches."

This scene is based on my all-time favorite smiley - ok Jean Shepherd story "Daphne Bigelow and the Spine-chilling Saga of the Sail-encrusted Tinfoil Noose" in the book _Wanda Hickey's Night of Golden Memories and Other Disasters_

You can find the Jean Shepherd page here: http://www.flicklives.com/ If you follow the link for Mass Backwards you will find an archive of Shepherd's live radio shows when he was broadcasting in New York City.


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2051

DA ; Simply Vicky: Don't get pithy with me!

I must have a look for this guy - another funny author is David Brin - no, really, the first sf books I read by him were hilarious!


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2052

Sho - gainfully employed again

SC - those Full House books should be on the "waste of trees" list.

Another good series are the Tory Bauer ones by Kathleen Taylor. I can't remember the titles too well, but I think the first is Funeral Food.

Another lot which made me laugh a lot in places were the Monsieur Pamplemousse books by Michael Bond (yes, Paddington guy, but these are for "grown ups"). The first one is simply called Monsieur Pamplemousse: a food inspector for a guide in France. He is an ex inspector from the Suretee (sp?) and stumbles on murder mysteries. There are vague references to why he had to leave the police (involving several chorus girls) and his trusty side kick is a dog (bassett hound or something) who has a blow up kennel for when they stay in less "dog friendly" establishments.


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2053

SnowWhite

WOW! Thanks for all the mentions! smiley - smiley
I never thought there was so much humour out there; I always have such a hard time finding it; maybe I should change where I go....
Cheers! smiley - cider
Morgan


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2054

Spaceechik, Typomancer

Adelaide said: "another funny author is David Brin - no, really, the first sf books I read by him were hilarious! "

You must be talking about his "The Practice Effect", featuring a scientist from our universe falling into another universe where entropy is reversed. It's more a fantasy novel than science fiction. He is one of my top Five authors of all time, but I don't remember any other LOL stuff.

He does characterization extremely well (especially for a hard SF author), and I have read everything he's written except "Glory Season" and the second trilogy of the Uplift series. But he's not generally "hilarious"; wry and a good read, but...

Here's a sample of his writing -- it's a short story on his website, a good story but also illustrative of a principle of physics:
http://www.davidbrin.com/tankfarm1.html

Unfortunately, tank farms will not be a reality -- the space shuttle is being junked in the next couple of years.

I think his stuff is really good; he has a collection of short stories called "Otherwhere" which opens with a story set in an L.A. land-fill archeological dig... smiley - smiley

SC










Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2055

Spaceechik, Typomancer

RE: David Brin:

Give him a chance; he wrote the novel "The Postman". The film was Kevin Costner's fault. smiley - winkeye

SC


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2056

A Super Furry Animal

I read The Da Vinci Code. I thought it was a pile of poo. I also thought there were a number of errors of fact within it.

Currently reading A Big Boy Did It And Ran Away, by Christopher Brookmyre. OK< not the world's most challenging author, but boy is it funny!

RFsmiley - evilgrin


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2057

Ek* this space intentionally left blank *ki

Currently reading The Famished Road by Ben Okri ... slightly different from the last few books I've read but good all the same.

Last few books:
Christopher Brookmyre's Quite Ugly One Morning ... utterly brilliant, there's no other word for it. Read it cover to cover twice in the space of a week.
T.C.Boyle's Drop City ... seriously good too. Recommended by quite the most delectable Canadian you could ever wish to meet ...
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole ... perhaps my expectations were too high. Sure Ignatius T Reilly was one of the most loathsome characters I've ever read about, but not up there on my list of "must reads".
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night by Mark Haddon, brilliantly written though with one of the best 'heroes' I've ever encountered.
The Invisible Man which, while enjoyable, annoyed me, and Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Mr Verne.

Oh, and Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss, a must for fastidious punctuators the world over ...

Can't wait for The Golem's Eye; Jonathon Stroud's next offering. The Amulet of Samarkand was just out of this world ... number two awaited with baited breath.


Around the World in 80 Days

Post 2058

Barry (ask me about the Disneyland Resort)

I just finished _Around the World in 80 Days_ and thoroughly enjoyed it. It puts the original movie (and probably the remake which I have no intention of seeing) to shame. It is like a British version of a Mark Twain travelogue.


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2059

DA ; Simply Vicky: Don't get pithy with me!

Yes, you're right, SpaceCadette, I may well have given the wrong impression about David Brin. I was thinking of 'The Practice Effect'... which was exactly my favourite type of humour, wry, not laugh out loud! One of the funniest for LOL is Dave Barry - and then there's someone called John Barnes, he wrote Princess of the Aerie and that series - very funny and very serious at the same time. I'd never heard of him before!


Le Morte d'Arthur and Salmon of Doubt

Post 2060

DA ; Simply Vicky: Don't get pithy with me!

I can't wait to read Lynne Truss' book, there've been interviews with her in our local newspaper.


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