A Conversation for Ask h2g2

Wool over your eyes

Post 16741

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

smiley - ok
I confess I have gone off on one of my obsessive wanderings
through many possibilities of spelling variants that will occur
when a single syllable word ending in a single consonant gets
'suffixed'.

It ain't just the double oo; most of the examples are reflexive,
others require some thought.

Top/topping
Bop/bopping

Tan/tanning
Ban/banning

Sail/sailing
Bail/bailing
Jail/jailing

Rot/rotten
Sod/sodden

Mew/mewing
New/newing
Sew/sewing

Mad/madden
Sad/sadden

Box/boxed
Dog/dogged

Tell/telling
Gel/gelling

Sit/sitting
Pit/pitting
Spit/spitting

Pig/pigging
Rig/rigging

Dun/dunning
Sun/sunning

Exit/exiting
Edit/editing

Fix/fixing
Fox/foxing

As always, thought stimulated by this thread has brought to my
conscious mind so many automatic, subconscious spelling processes.

And for all that, being caught between British and US English
I will always have problems with bus/busing, wool/woolen and
travel/traveler.

smiley - cheers
~jwf~


Wool over your eyes

Post 16742

You can call me TC

That was exactly my point, KB. The odd thing about it being that the BBC have given up trying to remember the adjective pertainig to Belgium is "Belgian" or any other (Spanish, Egyptian, Thai, Chinese - it can't be *that* hard) and yet in this case they have used the adjective which seemed rather unfitting. I wish I could find the page it's on now.


Ciphering away

Post 16743

Recumbentman

An editorial in esterday's Guardian has an unusual usage: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/09/unthinkable-stuff-the-pandas

"One that sentimentality is obsessed by while funds are disproportionately ciphered away from the other 20,933 species facing extinction."

Anybody heard of "ciphering away"? I haven't. The OED gives it as a synonym for chamfering or bevelling off, used in Naval Architecture, with examples cited from 1674 and 1711.

Surely "siphoning off" is what you do to funds?


Wool over your eyes

Post 16744

Bald Bloke

I think you are right, Siphoning fits much better, it looks like a grauniadism.


Wool over your eyes

Post 16745

KB

I quite like the phrase "cipher off funds", though. It gives the proceedings a hint of safe deposit boxes an bogus accounts in the Cayman Islands. smiley - laugh


Wool over your eyes

Post 16746

Recumbentman

Creative usage, certainly, if intended.


Wool over your eyes

Post 16747

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

smiley - book

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/10240917/Uproar-as-OED-includes-erroneous-use-of-literally.html

smiley - yikes
~jwf~


Wool over your eyes

Post 16748

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

smiley - book

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22403731

smiley - cheers
~jwf~


Wool over your eyes

Post 16749

Recumbentman

Nice article that.


Wool over your eyes

Post 16750

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

Oh I do hope this passes moderation...
Cuz it's funny...
It certainly meets with being on topic...
>>
On his 71st birthday a 'young' man got a gift certificate from his wife. The certificate paid for a visit to a medicine man living on a nearby reservation who was rumored to have a real and wonderful cure for erectile dysfunction.

After being persuaded, he drove to the reservation, handed his certificate to the medicine man and wondered what he was in for.


The old man handed a potion to him and, with a grip on his shoulder, warned,"This is a powerful medicine. You take only a teaspoonful and then say '1-2-3'. When you do, you will become more manly than you have ever been in your life and you can perform as long as you want."

The man was encouraged. As he walked away, he turned and asked, "How do I stop the medicine from working?"


"Your partner must say '1-2-3-4'," he responded, "But when she does, the medicine will not work again until the next full moon."

He was very eager to see if it worked so he went home, showered, shaved, took a spoonful of the medicine and then invited his wife to join him in the bedroom. When she came in, he took off his clothes and said, "1-2-3!" Immediately, he was the manliest of men.

His wife was excited and began pulling off her clothes and then she asked, "What was the 1-2-3 for?"

And that, dear friends, is why we should never end our sentences with a preposition, because we could end up with a dangling participle.
<<

smiley - seniorsmiley - jester
~jwf~


Wool over your eyes

Post 16751

Gnomon - time to move on

smiley - biggrin


Wool over your eyes

Post 16752

Gnomon - time to move on

Did you see Alice before you told that joke?


Wool over your eyes

Post 16753

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

smiley - erm
Alice? Qui?

smiley - cheers
~jwf~


Wool over your eyes

Post 16754

Pastey

Why wouldn't that pass moderation? smiley - erm


Wool over your eyes

Post 16755

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

smiley - bigeyes
Ah now there's a question I have often asked.
smiley - sadface
~jwf~


Wool over your eyes

Post 16756

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

@Gnomon
I think I've worked out the Alice reference.
It's from a scene in one of Lewis Carroll's tales.
smiley - ok
Poor Alice is confronted with a maddening solecism
that renders an atrocious misuse of grammar to a
meaninglessly obscure distortion of reality. The exact
scene escapes me (there were a few with the Mad
Hatter, the Caterpillar, the Cheshire Cat, the Red
Queen and the Tweedles).
smiley - cat
[ I am personally quite fond of the King's decree that
no one more than 42 feet tall will be admitted to view
or participate in the croquet. (Feet being quite a
relative term in Wonderland.) ]
smiley - footprints

And happily smiley - sadface I've examined my own mind to assess
the reason why it was not immediately obvious to me.
Of course I now realise it is the juxtaposition of sexual
innuendo (dangling parts) with a book about little girls.
smiley - bunny
I have a blind spot representing my overall resistance to
the kind of literary analysis that looks for clues and signs
of pedophilia in Carroll's works. I once wasted a half day
reading about Freudian interpretations of the Jabberwocky.
smiley - dragon
So it is little wonder I could not make the leap from dangly
bits to prepubescent maidens, none of whom were harmed
in the making of this posting.

smiley - zen
~jwf~


Wool over your eyes

Post 16757

Pastey

Moderation is only on things that break the House Rules, always has been since we took over. smiley - erm


Wool over your eyes

Post 16758

Recumbentman

I think Gnomon may not have been referring to Alice in Wonderland (or through the looking glass) at all, but to the vigour-enhancing pills that some also pronounce Sigh-yay-liss.


So long, I'm putting the kibosh on you

Post 16759

Recumbentman

My Irish teacher in school was scathing about the reluctance of English lexicographers to acknowledge the Irish origin of certain words. One example is “so long”, from the Irish farewell “slán”. The OED says "compare German so lange" but is that ever used for "goodbye"? "Hi" on the other hand is a direct lift from Swedish.

Another is “putting the kibosh on” something or someone; OED defines it as “to dispose of finally, finish off, do for” and thinks “It has been stated to be Yiddish or Anglo-Hebraic”, but there is an answer closer to home: in Irish the phrase “cába bháis” means “the cape of death” and is pronounced “cawba-vawish”.


So long, I'm putting the kibosh on you

Post 16760

You can call me TC

I'm surprised it's taken so long for you to come up with this niggle.

We can assume that you're correcting it in the limerick dictionary?


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