A Conversation for Ask h2g2

Really, really?

Post 121

Phil

As an university student in N. Wales it seemed that when the locals were speaking in English they would end most sentences in yeah.
eg, Fancy a pint yeah.


Really, really?

Post 122

Nikki-D

I'm sure I've heard of the "isn't it?" ending coming from Wales and other places.
Then there's the more recent "init", much used in one particular sketch in the comedy "Goodness Gracious Me" (BBC of course !!)
There's a guy here where I work who is a typical Londoner, and he ends most sentences with "yeah?" It's so, so tempting to say "No?" or "Really?"
I don't think, like, I use any of these, k'now, filler words, yeah?


Really, really?

Post 123

Phil

Oh, whatever smiley - winkeye


Really, really?

Post 124

Kaeori

Absolutely!

smiley - coffee


Really, really?

Post 125

Munchkin

S'right


Really, really?

Post 126

SPINY (aka Ship's Cook)

I don't know if this vocal tic is peculiar to Edinburgh, but round here a nasty "eh" (pronounced as the first letter of the alphabet is)has become a filler.

Example: "I got a new car, eh, and my girflfriend cannae drive it, eh, because her feet dinnae reach the pedals, eh."

You could substitute "right", or as mentioned above, "know what I mean", but essentially its function appears to be to get the listener to agree with what the speaker is saying.

Ken whit ah mean, like?


Really, really?

Post 127

Is mise Duncan

There is also a far more dangerous one which is to dare the lsitener to disagree by adding "what" but not pronouncing the "t" to the end.

"See, this is the best pub in town, wha?"

<>====uuu====<


Really, really?

Post 128

SPINY (aka Ship's Cook)

Don't know that one, Mr Jones. Which part of the world do they say that in, so that I am forewarned?


Really, really?

Post 129

Lipsbury Pinfold (Part-time Timelord)

This is an old one ...

A language teacher once made the rash statment "in most languages a double negative can be understood as an affirmative but that the reverse never holds true"

to which one of his pupils replied "Aye, right!"


Really, really?

Post 130

Potholer

Ending a sentence with 'what' used to be an upper-class affectation :-
'I say, sir, don't you know what's what, what?'


Wha?

Post 131

Is mise Duncan

"Wha?" is used in any place where "pal" is used in a non friendly manner - i.e. Glasgow and Dublin etc.
If someone says "Y'allright pal?" in these parts they are not asking after your health, but rather asking you what your business is...


Wha?

Post 132

?

I was wondering about "ken" the other day (really). What seemed strange is that the word "kennis" (Dutch for knowledge) seems to be related to "ken".
(No jokes about hag/haggis, please, I've got a hangover...)


Ken

Post 133

Gnomon - time to move on

It's not that surprising that the word knowledge in English and the word kennis in Dutch are closely related. The two languages are actually very close to each other.

"Know" was pronounced "kennow" in English in olden times. The English dropped the "ke" part while the Scots dropped the "ow" part, leading to "know" and "ken".


Ken

Post 134

Mustapha

Anyone for kennis?


Ken

Post 135

?

The same "kennis" also means acquaintance (in Dutch again).
(But tennis does not mean tnowledge...)


Ken

Post 136

Mustapha

Tennis apparently means to hold, from Anglo-French tenetz, and further back to Old French tenir and Latin tenere. One presumes it's the tennis racket that's being held, and not the balls. Though the balls are held, if only briefly. (Isn't it always the case?)


Ken

Post 137

?

Tennis-players are tenants then? Sometimes the wait for a serve can be tedious...


Ken

Post 138

Nikki-D

Mustapha's balls ?

Beware the BBC Moderation Police, who may (or may not) be moderate!

Actually (!), I think balls in most sports are held only (relatively) briefly - they don't do what they're good at (bounce, roll etc.) if you hang on to them.


Ken

Post 139

You can call me TC

.. perhaps if you oiled them a bit.... Oh no, sorry, LInda, wrong thread...........


Kennen is also "to know" in German, as in to know a person - not a fact. The same distinction as with connaƮtre and savoir in French.

Little Behemoth of Yahoo Chat Forum fame has some fascinating facts on the use of British English. I have invited her along. She has mentioned words that appear only to be used in Brighton (does this count as a foreign language?) and another one indigenous to Nottingham.

Here are her words:

Have you ever heard of the word 'twitten'? I was taught it by my
folks who were both Brightoners as a word that meant 'alleyway'
or 'shortcut', but it has been brought to my attention that they
don't use it anywhere else in England. Is it peculiar to them or is
this a true Brighton colloquialism? Anyone else heard of a similar
word? I heard a Nottingham lass use the word 'twitchell' once, which
is probably from the same root.. anyone got any ideas where they
could have come from?


Ken

Post 140

Little Behemoth (sulking)

*wanders in and coughs*

TC suggested that I bring my concerns to you knowledgeable folk.. *grins* So to start with, here's a copy of the question I wrote after the above 'twitten' question from the n2g2 talk thingy.. smiley - smiley

"While I'm on the subject I once heard that Shakespeare made up a heap of words including 'bubble'. Do you know if this is true? And what on EARTH did they call bubbles before that?"

If anyone can shed some light on the Shakespeare/bubble quandry I'd be most grateful-like smiley - smiley

L'il B. smiley - elf
(abusing the english language on a regular basis smiley - winkeye )


Key: Complain about this post