A Conversation for Ask h2g2

Late Post

Post 12461

You can call me TC

Why use a foreign word when there's a perfectly good English one? A German wouldn't use the word "deposit" - despite the tidal wave of angli- and americanisms infiltrating the language.

Still, the English speaking world misuses so many German words ... at least "Pfand" MEANS deposit. (Actually it also means forfeit, like in party games, or "to pawn". It is NOT the word used when paying a deposit when renting a flat, hiring a car or boat etc, to be returned later when the hired object is brought back in good condition. That is called a "Kaution".) <-- in brackets in case someone complains it's nothing to do with British English. Which it isn't.


French words

Post 12462

Goyahkla

It has been a long time since my last post, so here's a "nice to see you again" to the people that were around back then, and a "nice to meet you" to the new contributors!

I use the word 'Trebuchet'(French pronunciation, but then, I'm Dutch) quite often these days. I was given a game on my birthday, called "Shadows over Camelot", which features them.
However, the wor'd(s) 'cul de sac', are those pronounced in the French way?

By the way, I was on holiday in England two weeks ago. On the ferry, some people were pronouning 'Harwich' this way:
Har, as in harbour, and
wich, as in which.
That sounds awful, even to me, but makes me feel bad at the same time, because a lot of my vocabulary comes from reading English books. The trouble is, I have learned quite a few words over the years, some of which I have never heard anyone pronounce. When I was over in Oxfordshire, I frequently asked people I was talking to/with to correct me, and they did smiley - smiley


French words

Post 12463

You can call me TC

Har-Which? smiley - headhurts

Have you ever been on a ferry to Dun Laoghaire?


French words

Post 12464

Spankmunki: The Answer is Lemons. Next break in the current workload due mid-December.

No, but I've been to Dun Morogh smiley - geeksmiley - biggrin


French words

Post 12465

Edward the Bonobo - Gone.

Cul de sac...we don't *really* pronounce it the way the French would:
- We follow the English stress pattern (stress on the 'cul') rather than even stress, as in French.
- The 'de' tend to be 'dee'
- The u in 'cul' is as in 'but' - not the French u (make an O with your lips and say E)


French words

Post 12466

Spankmunki: The Answer is Lemons. Next break in the current workload due mid-December.

I'd have said:

'Kul-der-sack'.

With 'kul' pronounced the same as cull (as in Seal cull).


French words

Post 12467

Goyahkla

Must say though, cul de sac, even pronounced like you said is better than 'dead end of a dead-end street'smiley - smiley

Oh, and in the backlog, I saw someone mentioning 'liet', and that it were Dutch. It is, it's past-tense, singular of 'laten', to refrain from something or have something done.
'Zij liet haar auto repareren', she had her car fixed.


German, Swiss

Post 12468

Goyahkla

A bit unrelated to the topic, as it has nothing to do with the English language, but here goes...

The regional dialect here, Groningen, stems from Dyts. It's very odd that when I am in Switzerland, I can make myself reasonable understood when lacing German with Gronings, something I tend to do when in Germany, and even in Denmark, with varying results. People take it in stride, as do I when they reply in their mother tongue. Must be some left-over from the time the Hanse-cities were the ruling cities in Europe.


German, Swiss

Post 12469

Edward the Bonobo - Gone.

It is said that Frisian and some Yorkshire coastal dialects were mutually intelligible. (I doubt this is true these days)


Cul de sac

Post 12470

Recumbentman

French people are often amused/bemused (maybe even ceemused) by this term which is not at all current in French. I have never heard it pronounced as it would be in French (cüd'sac) except by those same bemused Francophones.


Cul de sac

Post 12471

Gnomon - time to move on

We'd be bemused if such roads carried the sign "Bag End" in France.


Cul de sac

Post 12472

Recumbentman

Touché.


Cul de sac

Post 12473

Is mise Duncan

French road signs for "mud on the road" say "boue" which amused/bemused this ancient Anglo.


English as she is spoke

Post 12474

Vestboy

Well, is that it? Have we sorted out the language?


English as she is spoke

Post 12475

~ jwf ~ scribblo ergo sum

smiley - bigeyes
Not while I and John Milton live in envy of the Bard!
smiley - peacedove
~jwf~


English as she is spoke

Post 12476

Wand'rin star

(smiley - smiley Anybody that posts 6 hours before I get to work has to be ~jwf~) I too am assembling a quilt from the linguistic ragbag that is my brain and will be asking for help sewing in the very near future. For the time being, consider the word "bootee". The "ee" suffix obvious;y has a different meaning from "employee" etc.Just a diminutive, do you think? In fact all the words connected with "layette" are odd.Where do you think "pilcher" came from? smiley - starsmiley - star


English as she is spoke

Post 12477

You can call me TC

pilchards?


-ee, I thought was a diminuitive, as well as a suffix for someone being on the receiving end of something. But, now you mention it. Diminuitives ending in '-ee'?

I'm racking my brain to think of the other contents of a layette which might sound odd. It all sounds rather French to me, although I have no comprehensive knowledge of the parts of a layette in French. I know plenty of French mums, though, and will ask as soon as I see one.


English as she is spoke

Post 12478

Edward the Bonobo - Gone.

We use diminutives with children: Doggy-y, Horse-y, Bird-y, Mum(m)-y, Dad(d)-y...

I'd have thought, though, that 'employee' is derived from the French participle, 'employé' - employed.

Pilchards...I was going to mention them re another matter...but I forget why. It'll come back to me. Maybe.


English as she is spoke

Post 12479

You can call me TC

So 'bootee' is only spelt like that so as not to confuse it with 'booty'?

"Booty" as in the takings from a scavenge or robbery is very similar to the German word "Beute" and probably has nothing to do with boots.


English as she is spoke

Post 12480

U173821

I always thought that the diminutive form of 'boot' was 'bootie'. Not seen the 'ee' version before.

Could it be that it is the 'y/ee/ie' sound that was originally diminutive and that alternative spellings have been settled on for different words?

Although perhaps the oddest use of the word comes from gangsta rap. I'm still puzzled as to why shaking childrens footwear is such a common theme, nor why the males of this social group are so keen on watching women do this.


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