A Conversation for Ask h2g2

Shaking of sticks

Post 101

Wand'rin star

I think it's to do with walnut trees. You beat them with sticks to get the nuts down. If said nuts are ready to drop you just threaten the tree with your stick. (It doesn't sound very plausible to me either, but it gets back to the forbidden subject of the original thread)smiley - star


Shaking of sticks

Post 102

Nikki-D

I wonder if it matters how big the stick is that one shakes at things ?
Also, should it be an analogue or digital stick ?


Shaking of sticks

Post 103

Is mise Duncan

It could just as well be digital - if it is stocastic(k) smiley - laugh


Shaking of sticks

Post 104

Kaeori

Is there an important qualitative distinction between merely pointing the stick and actually shaking the stick?

Oh yes, this seems a good time to ask if the word 'actually' should never, ever be used (some people use it in speech all the time)?

smiley - coffee


Shaking of sticks

Post 105

Wand'rin star

You _can_ use it, but only if you're tall enough to look down your nose and pronounce it"eksurely"
Size of sticks? Have cudgelled the brains on this, but the picture that comes to mind is a shepherd's crook (or crozier)So I would agree that it's either sheep or parishoners we're shaking at. Perhaps it goes back to Moses, shaking his staff to conjure miracles?smiley - star


Shaking of sticks

Post 106

Potholer

'Actually' can be quite useful sometimes to soften a contradiction, implying that whilst in an ideal world someone really should be right, in fact they aren't.


Shaking of sticks

Post 107

Mustapha

What about the repetition of the word 'really' in response, or most usually, secondary response to an astounding piece of information.

Example:
A: Really?
B: Yes.
A: REALLY, really?
B: YES!

I keep hearing this on supposedly reputable interview shows.


Really?

Post 108

Wand'rin star

Too many books on English conversation for foreigners instruct them to make copious use of such fillers to show they're still awake.One of my fluffyheads was so exhuberantly complying yesterday that I had to teach the whole class the meaning of "take the p**s"smiley - star


Really?

Post 109

Mustapha

At what stage then does one teach the meaning of "taking the mickey"?

And any how, is one's p**s or mickey something they would wish to keep?


Really?

Post 110

Munchkin

If you want this giant talking mouse you are welcome to him. smiley - smiley
As to extracting the urine (hopes this is sufficiently moderate to survive) that has always worried me. Perhaps it comes from some old medieval joke involving travelling performers and buckets of unmentionables. Certainly, most of Shakespeares jokes for the plebs were deeply unpleasent.


Really?

Post 111

Mustapha

"As to extracting the urine (hopes this is sufficiently moderate to survive)"

As I hope "male bovine excretia" would be also. smiley - winkeye

Mustapha the Rule-Bender


Really? Actually, yes !

Post 112

Nikki-D

"Actually" is only fearfully awful (or awfully fearful) when it's tag on to the end of a sentence by some clot who's trying to add emphasis...
"I *am* the Queen of the Fairies, actually"
"Really ?"

I've always through it was a useful word when connected with a doing-word, suggesting more than just intention ...
"You mean you actually think you're the Queen of the Fairies ?"
"Mmm, really"


Really? Actually, yes !

Post 113

Wand'rin star

"I'm actually sitting in the self-access centre waiting for students to come with their English language problems" (true) gives it more the meaning of "at the present time" which is still acceptable, actually smiley - star


Really, really?

Post 114

Mustapha

Forgive me, I mean to cast no aspersions on a fine and upstanding adverb and interjection such as 'really'. 'Really' I don't. smiley - winkeye

I merely seek to question it's repetition, which is both unnecessary and a perversion of its intended purpose.


Really, really?

Post 115

Kaeori

One of the top UK libel lawyers (I think he recently died) used the word "really" to great affect.

"My reputation has been shattered and I have suffered greatly."
"Really?!"

With that short word (accompanied by a slightly raised eyebrow) you felt he was inviting the jury to dismiss everything that had been said. It was a question, a comment and an expression of disdain, all rolled into one.

smiley - coffee


Really, really?

Post 116

Nikki-D

It's really, really difficult to do a raised eyebrow here, actually.


Really, really?

Post 117

Mustapha

"Jury will disregard that eyebrow. If counsel raises it again, I will find you in contempt!"


Really, really?

Post 118

Kaeori

Actually, if we're really going to do this subject, we should mention "you know", or the longer "you know what I mean", which around these parts becomes "naah wata meeen". Favored by boxers, actually. No, really!smiley - smiley

smiley - coffee


Really, really?

Post 119

Is mise Duncan

(EMIR) Although it is more of an Irish dialect thing, the one that gets me is the stock answer to a question "Ah sure, don't you know yourself" and its many variants.
If I knew the answer myself, why would I ask the question?

<>====uuu====<


Really, really?

Post 120

Munchkin

Back in darkest Ayrshire most sentences ended with like, or the sometimes more upmarket by the way. As in;
"Me and Jen were doon the shops like."
"Aye, ony yin there by the way?"
"Just Shug, ken."

Ken, while not so popular in Ayrshire is very widely used over in the East of Scotland. I once saw a TV interview with some teenager from Edinburgh who talked for five minutes straight with every sentence ending in ken. Sometimes it even appeared in the middle of sentences as well ... like.

Ah well, I'm off to work now, by the way.


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