A Conversation for GG: The Nautilus - a Creature of the Deep

Peer Review: A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 1

Gnomon - time to move on

Entry: Nautiluses - A942572
Author: Gnomon - U151503

I've asked my daughter, Insecteen, to do an illustration for this, but I don't know whether she will get around to it.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 2

Lanzababy - Guide Editor

I shall look forward to reading this in the morning Gnomon - *rubs hands with glee* smiley - ok


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 3

Lanzababy - Guide Editor

Excellent! I really like the way you pitch this introduction to the Nautilus - it is so easy to become dry and fact filled, which will deter the casual reader to finish the whole article. This article leads you into wanting to know more - very well done.


I'm less sure that the title has that zingy quality though - whilst
'Nautiluses' may be grammatically correct - the title could have a bit more pulling power, such as

The Nautilus, a Creature from the Deep Sea.

or maybe just 'The Nautilus'

I found the mathematical section very interesting too, smiley - smiley

There are a few minor nit picks, but I will wait for other reviewers to comment first.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 4

U168592

A46714665


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 5

Gnomon - time to move on

Thanks, Matt. I've added that link.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 6

MazinMadFiddler - Keeper of Mustalids and PMA.

smiley - biro but we're not going to talk about the paper nautilus here.

From a PR position, as I do not like the inclusion 'we're not', I'd prefer 'but the paper nautilus is not part of this entry.'

MMF
smiley - musicalnote


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 7

MazinMadFiddler - Keeper of Mustalids and PMA.

>>The basic shape of a nautilus is like the shell of a garden snail, but with the opening facing upwards.<<

I am surprised at this. The nautilus is nothing like a garden snail, not being pyrimidal in shape. It is a spiral tube, coiled from the centre, and in a flattened disc shape.

>>We'll say more about them later<<

smiley - biro These will be discussed later. I didn't think entries could be personalised. smiley - huh

But then:
>>The name Nautilus comes from the Greek word 'nautilos' meaning 'sailor'. Originally the name applied to a different creature, the octopus known as the argonaut or paper nautilus. Two of the tentacles of this creature are flattened into a paddle shape, and it was thought in ancient times that the creature raised these into the air as sails to catch the wind, so they were called 'sailors'. The other notable feature of the paper nautilus is that it makes a delicate spiral shell, not to live in but to lay its eggs in. When the first chambered nautiluses were found, it was assumed they were the same type of creature so the name 'nautilus' was transferred to them.<< smiley - huh

I do not believe there is a plural for nautilus. It is one nautilus, two nautilus, etc.

>>but were actually closer related to the modern octopus.<<
smiley - biro but were actually more closely related to the modern octopus.

>>the trigger-fish and octopuses<<
smiley - biro the trigger-fish and octopus

>>Nautiluses, on the other hand, have eyes which are much simpler.<<
smiley - biroNautilus on the other hand, not being directly related, have eyes which are much simpler.

>>which they probably use in hunting.<<
smiley - biro which may assist them in hunting.

>>The nautilus's shell is spiral (helical) like a snail's shell, but is divided into sealed compartments or chambers.<<

Few snails are truly helical, most are helical, pyrimoidal. This could be confusing!!!

Apologies for spelling errors.

Happy to discuss the above!

Otherwise impressive, especially the maths. OTT for me!

MMF

smiley - musicalnote



A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 8

MazinMadFiddler - Keeper of Mustalids and PMA.

May be worth looking here for additional info:

http://www.thecephalopodpage.org/tentacle.php

I would have also mntioned it spends the daylight hours at depths of upto 2,000' only rising to the surface at night.

Another variation on the snail is that the nautilus occupies the last chamber of it's shell, where as the snail occupies it's entirity. The balance of the shell is used for bouyancy, enabling it to descend to 2,000' feet during the day, and rising to 300' - 500' at night, by adjusting the bouyancy.

It does, however, use a similar propulsion method as octopus, using a powerful syphon to propel themselves backwards.

Further info available if required, such as food type, closing off of tentacle aperture, and the siphuncle, that allows gaseous control in the chambers.

MMF

smiley - musicalnote


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 9

Gnomon - time to move on

Thanks, MMF. All that info was already in the entry.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 10

Gnomon - time to move on

well, all of it except the bit about it changing its depth by adjusting the buoyancy. That isn't true.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 11

Not-so-bald-eagle


>>Plural
Webster's says it's Nautiluses or Nautili (I kinda like the 'naughtily')


Any chance of any recipes?

smiley - coolsmiley - bubbly


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 12

Gnomon - time to move on

One site says that the Nautilus pompilius is used as a food source in Negros Island in the Phillippines, but I haven't found any details on how they cook them. If they're like squid and octopus, then they are chewy and rather fishy-tasting. I think fried would be best.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 13

Gnomon - time to move on

I've changed the title to "The Nautilus - a Creature of the Deep" but I'm pretty sure that the Eds will change it back. They like titles that are short, without dramatic bits stuck on the end.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 14

Lanzababy - Guide Editor

smiley - ok Thanks!


smiley - rofl I'd love to be able to say *I* was free of a dramatic bit stuck on the end -silly smiley - silly moment, (sorry Gnomon.smiley - blush)


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 15

Gnomon - time to move on

Insecteen has done the illustration, but I'm waiting for her to colour it in. Then I have to figure out why my scanner isn't working - the USB cable must have got disconnected somewhere in the mess of wires behind my computer.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 16

Lanzababy - Guide Editor

I'm looking forward to it! and cables are the bane of modern life.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 17

Gnomon - time to move on

I've added a link to the first draft of Insecteen's picture of a Nautilus. This was coloured in by my using Paint. She's promised to do a proper colouring job later.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 18

Lanzababy - Guide Editor

weird creatures aren't they? A good drawing - and it was how I was expecting it to look after reading your text. smiley - smiley


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 19

Gnomon - time to move on

Thanks, Lanzababy.

I see I completely missed a long and detailed posting by MMF. I wasn't ignoring it, MMF, I just didn't see it. But on a quick read through it I think I disagree with just about everything in it. I'll have another read tomorrow, and then give a considered reply.


A942572 - Nautiluses

Post 20

Gnomon - time to move on

the basic shape of a garden snail -- I'll go out into the garden tomorrow and find a snail

>> I didn't think entries could be personalised

They can. It is "I" and "me" that are not allowed, because guide entries are written by the collective. The informal approach of "we'll say more about them later" sounds better to me in a Guide than the formal "These will be discussed later".

>>I do not believe there is a plural for nautilus.

There is. The OED gives two, one of which is "nautiluses" and neither of which is "nautilus". Since we say "octopuses" and "platypuses", I think "nautiluses" sounds best.

closer related --> more closely related -- Done.

the trigger-fish and octopus -- Done.

>>Nautilus on the other hand, not being directly related, have eyes which are much simpler

-- I don't understand what you mean by "not being directly related" and don't see any reason to include it.

Nautiluses, squids, octopuses and cuttlefish are all cephalopods, although the cephalopods can be divided into two groups, the nautiluses in one and the other three in the other.

Changing "which they probably use in hunting" to "which may assist them in hunting" -- they both mean the same but the latter is open to misinterpretation as it could be taken to apply to the poor vision, so I'll leave it as it is.

I've removed the "helical" from the description of the shell, as it is open to misinterpretation, but I'm going to wait to examine a snail's shell before deciding about changing the descriptions of the nautilus shell.

smiley - smiley



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