A Conversation for Flappy Feathered Physics

Are they killer gulls, or ordinary ones?

Post 1

paulh, the apocalypse is coming, it's just late

I read somewhere that in parts of England, seagull eggs are considered quite a rare delicacy. They aren't cheap, anyway, as it takes quite a bit of effort to find seagull nests on rocky cliffs along the shore, climb up when the gulls are away, and pilfer the eggs.

Not an activity for the faint of heart.

Maybe if the gulls in the pictures ever cross the Atlantic, I will wave to them as they fly by.


Are they killer gulls, or ordinary ones?

Post 2

Fwr

Probably Yorkshire for the seagull eggs, they like to be a bit different than the rest of us...


Are they killer gulls, or ordinary ones?

Post 3

paulh, the apocalypse is coming, it's just late

Well. seagulls seem to prefer having their nests on inaccessible rocky ledges by the sea. Does Yorkshire have many such ledges?


Are they killer gulls, or ordinary ones?

Post 4

Fwr

I'm sure they have the best inaccessible rocky ledges in the world...we used to dream of inaccessible rocky ledges... Cue Monty Python...


Are they killer gulls, or ordinary ones?

Post 5

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

smiley - snork Yorkshire is the Texas of England, just as Bavaria is the Texas of Germany...

North Americans who don't live on the east or west coast regard all these ocean-related things, like beaches, driftwood, sea shells, and sea birds as terribly exotic. We appreciate getting these glimpses, especially this year, with no travel.

We're used to lakes, rivers, creeks, springs, even wetlands...different ecosystems.

I used to be amazed to find seagulls in the parking lot of the Walmart in Philadelphia. It was close to the Delaware River, which flows into the Atlantic.


Are they killer gulls, or ordinary ones?

Post 6

paulh, the apocalypse is coming, it's just late

Seagulls fly across vast oceans, nonstop and with no pit stops. That they can get as far inland as Philadelphia is not much of a stretch.

I admire their flying capacities. Other than that, the only thing I hold against them is that they ate all the goldfish in Coggshall Pond in Leominster (Massachusetts) many years ago.

At last, that is what we were told.

But I suppose a seagull is by nature an opportunist. If the fish are easy to spot, why not feast on them? That's easier than foraging for fish in a constantly moving ocean.


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