A Conversation for Etude with a Disco Beat

Disco Beat

Post 1

Willem

You did nice here it was catchy! I love that line in the PSB song ...


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Post 2

paulh. Bunnies are cute (There, I've said it)

I like pet Shop Boys too, but don't remember that exact song.

If Chopin heard your version, would he be discombobulated?


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Post 3

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Not Banned in China

Nah. He and Liszt were essentially pop musicians. smiley - laugh


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Post 4

paulh. Bunnies are cute (There, I've said it)

That they were. smiley - smiley


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Post 5

Elektragheorgheni -Please read 'The Post'

I think they even had groupies!


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Post 6

SashaQ - happysad

Thanks everyone!

Yes, it is important to remember that what we think of as Classical music was Pop music at the time, and could be outrageous, too. Eg Stravinsky's Rite of Spring is not quite so shocking as it was when it premiered, although it is still unusual - I much prefer it as a ballet performance than a piece of music in its own right, as the actions help the discord to make sense smiley - fairy Other pieces, like Chopin's contain catchy themes, though, so I enjoy listening to them in their own right smiley - musicalnotesmiley - biggrin


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Post 7

paulh. Bunnies are cute (There, I've said it)

Chopin's "Raindrops" was altered to become the pop song "I'm forever chasing rainbows."


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Post 8

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Not Banned in China

'I'm *Always* Chasing Rainbows'. I'm forever *blowing bubbles*...different (and much worse) melody. smiley - laugh

The reason I dislike Tchaikovsky is exactly the same as the reason I dislike Andrew Lloyd Webber - empty, melody-heavy music. As it turns out, contemporary concertgoers felt the same way about Tchaikovsky.

How about some Borodin?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0c3od7KynE

I like this clip, not because the singing is any good, but because the fatuous performers are upstaged by a decorative chicken. smiley - zen


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Post 9

paulh. Bunnies are cute (There, I've said it)

Dmitri, Vic Damon had the best "pipes" of his generation, according to no less than Frank Sinatra.

I never get tired of hearing Borodin's music. (Borodin himself can no longer be heard, unless you contact him at a seance.)

As for Tchaikovsky's "melody-heavy" music, there was a huge divide over that in the 19th century. It continues to this day. I had one friend who loved Tchaikovsky but hated Brahms because Brahms couldn't find a melody if it was right in front o his nose. Another friend preferred Brahms to Tchaikovsky, probably for the same reason you dislike Tchaikovsky.

But for me it all depends which piece you're talking about. I love the big tune in Brahms's first symphony, and the coda in his "Alto rhapsody." I can't get enough of the march at the beginning of Tchaikovsky's "Sleeping beauty," or "Souvenir de Florence" or "Serenade for strings." Most of "Nutcracker suite" bores me because of overexposure.


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Post 10

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Not Banned in China

smiley - laugh When I was about 14, I told my piano teacher that Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture had 'everything in it but the kitchen sink.' She thought a minute and said, 'You're right.'

I dislike Sinatra intensely, so that's no recommendation. smiley - rofl

The late Oliver Sacks did a great book on musicality. He commented on the neurological basis of the difference in composers by their melodic and other inclinations. smiley - smiley He also used music for therapy.


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Post 11

SashaQ - happysad

Yep, there would have been a kitchen sink in 1812 Overture if it would have been possible! smiley - laugh

Yes, I like Tchaikovsky for the 'melody-heavy' music - good to know you will particularly enjoy one of my upcoming videos, paulh smiley - biggrin

I have the music for the Borodin piece, so I will have a go at recording that soon! The decorative chicken in the video is rather impressive smiley - laugh

"The late Oliver Sacks did a great book on musicality." - yes, I am glad to be able to say I have read that.


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Post 12

Willem

Heck, I don't actually, actively dislike any kind of music. To me it's all different forms through which the universe itself expresses its creativity. I'm in awe of it all. Still there's some music I'm easier able to sympathise with, some that just doesn't mean much to me at all. But Tchaikovsky, Borodin, Brahms, Sinatra, the PSB's … that's all fine by me.

I did love that chicken of paradise!


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Post 13

Willem

Speaking of Brahms, here's an interpretation of his 'Lullaby' by the famous Afrikaans singers 'Die Briels':

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpjAAhhqf84

They were working-class folks. Frans worked on the railway and for the local steel industry while Sannie was a forklift driver. They looked in the papers for news of disasters which they then made songs about.


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Post 14

Willem

Or try:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpjAAhhqf84


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Post 15

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Not Banned in China

The Hawaiian guitar... smiley - rofl And yodelling. smiley - rofl I wonder what Brahms would have said. He'd probably have enjoyed it, since he got exuberant about Hungarian-style folk:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3X9LvC9WkkQ

(Read the comments.)

It's fun to know that this sort of music is truly international. smiley - island


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Post 16

paulh. Bunnies are cute (There, I've said it)

"I dislike Sinatra intensely, so that's no recommendation. smiley - rofl"
[Dmitri]

The sound of Sinatra's voice doesn't have to disqualify him from having something valid to say. Did you know that he was sometimes hired to diagnose vocal problems in other actors, and that his advice sometimes helped? Can we get beyond our likes and dislikes to dig deeper into the meaning of things. I think we can. Let's try. smiley - smiley

"The late Oliver Sacks did a great book on musicality. He commented on the neurological basis of the difference in composers by their melodic and other inclinations" [Ibid. smiley - tongueout]

I admire Oliver Sacks. He's probably right about this. But I'm not sure his above-cited work is relevant to my point about Vic Damone's singing or vocal technique (or quality) in general. May I say that Toscanini could not carry a tune to save his life, but he could work with singers to create a valid musical experience for his listeners?

Vocal technique is what it is. Vocal quality is what it is as well. You can't affect the latter because your genes determine it. You *can* use the former to make the best of your voice, though. I've heard voice teachers work wonders in singers with vocal problems.

If you haven't had the longterm experience of working with your own voice to bring out its best features, I can't explain this in a way you will appreciate.

Back to Sinatra: he was a singer's singer. This means that people who know their stuff about all the elements of singing respect his breathing technique ( borrowed from brass players who had to simultaneously inhale through their noses and breath out through their mouths), his timing, and his ability to bring out nuances that not all of the people with naturally better voices could bring out.

But, yeah, I'm with you about listening to Sinatra for very long. He makes my throat feel tight, as I don't think he used diaphragmatic support the way he could have. I am *not* going to argue with Sinatra fans, though.

Forgive this long rant. I get carried away smiley - blush.


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Post 17

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Not Banned in China

smiley - snork Yeah, you do get carried away.

I dislike Sinatra for all kinds of reasons unrelated to the timbre of his voice. I dislike his song choices, the venues he sang at, his friends, his mob associates, his movie acting, his general attitude toward life, the hats he wore... this is personal, and does not impinge upon anyone else. smiley - rofl

For the rest, well, 'Over smak valt niet te twisten', as the Dutch say and I hope I spelled right. smiley - laugh


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Post 18

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Not Banned in China

Speaking of taking liberties with original keyboard music, which we were before being sidetracked, my Youtube page just threw up this insightful discussion of Czerny and Bach, and how fast Beethoven played, etc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crtHnsLlbuA

This is hilarious on so many levels...

'And I quote: [proceeds to read it aloud in French].' smiley - snork

The Excel spreadsheet is also a delight.


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Post 19

Willem

Over smaak valt niet te twisten! Mens hoef nie verskoning te vra vir jou smaak nie! De gustibus non est disputandum!

The Afrikaans is actually: you don't have to apologize for your taste. I got it like that from one of our good authors, now also sadly passed away, P. G. Du Plessis.

But there are in some way some things that I would say would disqualify certain forms of 'art' from in any way being tasteful … case in point a local group called 'Die Antwoord'. I think they're just nasty and am rather perplexed as to how anyone could like them. Perhaps some people think they're funny … I think they're really nasty in a nasty way.

But anyways I'll go check out that link ...




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Post 20

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Not Banned in China

smiley - laugh I hope you like the video, Willem. And if you don't like that group, I won't look them up.

My Dutch instructor at uni used a textbook with hundreds of Dutch proverbs in it. He said there was a proverb for everything in Dutch. Occasionally one pops into my head. smiley - rofl


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