A Conversation for Glamour Shot

Comments: Glamour Shot

Post 1

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

From FWR:

This one captures the effortless grace that cats possess, even whilst resting. The look of total contentment on that face!

This shot also shows the ability that felines possess to blend into their surroundings, ok so it's not hunting the keyboard, but it's easy to see how well adapted their coats are to camouflage.

Nice contrast of the domestic highlighting the hidden wildness in our pets DG.

From bobstafford:

A happy and graceful looking cat who knows it is lovely. The image shows the very contented face. A lovely photograph, enhanced by the darker background.


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Post 2

paulh, hiding under my bed

"Well naturally I'm tuckered out. I just played three Mozart piano sonatas."


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Post 3

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

More like, 'I stood on the keys with three paws, while with the fourth, I played with the setting wheel and produced three hideous chords in sci-fi versions and a set of hoofbeats, footsteps, shrieks and groans, and finished with a helicopter taking off.'

He does this when he wants 'his' piano bench back. smiley - cat


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Post 4

paulh, hiding under my bed

I've given you a link to "Kitten on the keys" before.

When I was growing up, we had a beat-up old piano in the basement. Strangely enough, the basement is where Fluffy (A cat I once had) died. We'll never know what killed him. I doubt that demons from the piano did it, but you never know smiley - whistle.

When I was much younger, I remember my sister practicing "Moonlight sonata" on that piano. Just the first movement, of course, as some of the others are much too advanced for a beginner. I still cringe when I hear that piece smiley - yikes.


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Post 5

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

smiley - snork Many a piano piece has been ruined that way.

When I was a teenager, my piano teacher, who was born in the late 1880s, wanted me to play Mendelssohn's 'Spring Song'. She was perplexed when I refused.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPwNbEySjG4

I explained about cartoons and their effect on early childhood consciousness.


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Post 6

paulh, hiding under my bed

MacDowell's "To a wild rose" was also featured in a cartoon. I can't find that cartoon on youtube, but here's one of someone playing the piece:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2V3HV3RBw6s

Here's a cartoon that expropriates Schumann's "Traumerei" as the tune for a tin pan ally song:
http://vimeo.com/261738358

The Devil made him do it! smiley - laugh


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Post 7

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

I don't think anyone can mess up 'To a Wild Rose'. As for the rest, Tin Pan Alley and/or the big band people got to most of the classical repertoire sooner or later. They did a job on Chopin. smiley - laugh

Of course, there's always 'Kismet', which ripped off Borodin, big-time. Mind you, that wasn't a bad thing. smiley - winkeye


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Post 8

paulh, hiding under my bed

I see what you mean regarding Chopin.

I'm always chasing rainbows
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CMSjI-Znc4

Sheesh!


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Post 9

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

Yes, one of the worst. smiley - rofl

Of course, Tchaikovsky got exactly what he deserved.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr3-sz3VPo4


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Post 10

paulh, hiding under my bed

For some reason, a lot of Tchaikovski's pieces were adapted for saxophone. But then, so was Debussy's "Golliwog's cakewalk."

What I don't know is whether the saxophone was an instrument of the orchestra during Tchaikovsky's time. Quite possibly it was, as Glazunov wrote a concerto for the instrument.

Other odd instruments were the trombone (Rimsky-Korsakov wrote a concerto for it) and Tuba (Vaughan Williams).

Adaptation for other instruments can be brilliant or groan-worthy. I've heard Mozart and Bach piano pieces transposed for flute.

Woody Allen joked about a tuba player who tried to play "Flight of the bumblebee and blew out his liver.


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Post 11

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

My violin teacher: What's the difference between a saxophone and a vacuum cleaner?

Me: I dunno. What is the difference between a saxophone and a vacuum cleaner?

Violin teacher: You can tune a vacuum cleaner.


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Post 12

paulh, hiding under my bed

I'm sure P.D.Q. Bach wrote music for the vacuum cleaner. He once wrote a pevertimento for bagpipes, bicycle, and balloons.


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Post 13

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

smiley - rofl That would work.

My aunt inherited my great-grandfather's home pump organ. You know, those things that go up to the ceiling and have Greek pillars and curlicues and such on them, and pull-out stop buttons that make ridiculous claims like 'vox humana'. The problem with playing them is that you have to pump the bellows with your feet while you play...

So she got her husband to rig up a blower in the floor. Made out of an old vacuum cleaner. He even added a switch to the 100-year-old organ, and voila, they'd gone electric. smiley - rofl

Made an incredible racket.


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Post 14

paulh, hiding under my bed

I don't remember ever playing a pump organ, but my mother had a sewing machine that ran by pumping action.


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Post 15

Dmitri Gheorgheni - Post Editor

My grandmother had one of those. smiley - smiley


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Post 16

paulh, hiding under my bed

Pianists and harpsichordists must have been relieved to have instruments that would work without the need for pumping. For some, this meant the possibility of having foot-operated notes. I remember reading that Mozart made use of this with some of the pianos he played.


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