A Conversation for Robert A. Heinlein

A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 41

several, a/k/a random

should i find time, i'll poke around www.spaceflight.nasa.gov and space.com, i know somewhere i've read engineers' comments on how heinlein, asimov and clarke's writings helped spur their imaginations at a young age to actually MAKE and DO what is now reality. i'm pretty sure Sir Doctor Isaac originally described the geo-snychronic orbit for the bleeping satellites we use today for teevees and cell phones. their words, back then, have become, thru modren tech-know-lodgy a part of our world, just as adams has helped create the Guide.
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 42

several, a/k/a random

along the same lines, i'm just reading about cyber-modification, implanting chips so the blind can semi-see and existing chips for the hearing-impaired, chips for moving muscles in the paralyzed and morphed back to Minerva/Teena/Mike/Michelle from 'the Moon' thru 'Sail Beyond' where information can be transferred brain-to-brain and responded to. far out, buck!
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 43

xyroth

sorry, it wasn't isaac, it was arthur c clarke who described the satellite in the amatuer radio magazine in the 40's.


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 44

Lentilla (Keeper of Non-Sequiturs)

Yeah, Clarke has always been on top of the science thing. I always liked his description of the skyhook in Fountains of Paradise.


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 45

several, a/k/a random

my bad. shoulda looked at my bookshelves and not into my memory.
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 46

Lentilla (Keeper of Non-Sequiturs)

Well, I went looking for information on Heinlein and the waterbed. Here you were trying to tell me I was crazy... He did invent them, and didn't need to apply for a patent because of the references to his inventing it in the public domain.

He was sick with tuberculosis, which was the reason for his leaving the Navy.

Text from Heinlein FAQ:
http://ebbs.english.vt.edu/20th/txts/heinlein/heinlein.lore.html

In article (Paul Hudson) writes:
>In article (Douglas Harper) writes:
>
> In _Double Star_, the late Robert Heinlein describes a waterbed being used as an acceleration couch. Did waterbeds already exist or did he invent them?
>
>As far as I know, he invented them. I remember seeing some dicussion
>as to whether he should have applied for a patent...
>--
>Paul Hudson

What happened was that somebody else applied for a patent but couldn't
get one because Heinlein had already though of the concept and then
written about it, thereby putting it in the public domain.

BTW, Heinlein thought up the concept when he was sick (with malaria?).
It seems that one night in Panama he was lying in basically a blood-warm swimming pool, one of the more comfortable experiences of his life. When he got sick he often thought back to that night and about how uncomfortable his then present bed was. Expanding on the idea brought up the waterbed.


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 47

several, a/k/a random

which he wrote about (in the public domain) and left for better engineers than he to design and patent. it took the plastics industry YEARS to develop a material that wouldn't leak.


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 48

several, a/k/a random

i refer to 'expanded universe' copyright 1980 by RAH and ACE Books, pages 516 to 518 where he explains he had mentioned it in previous works and described a waterbed in full in 'stranger' (1960, i think)
and how it couldn't be patented...boys and girls, this stuff robert anson heinlein ALREADY WROTE. it's IN his books, just get a h2g2 Guide entry on heinlein and refer to all the sites already online where you all can fight out the esoteric horse hockey. robert a. heinlein DESERVES a Guide entry.
i'm sorta sorry i went off on ya's like that but i'm NOT sorry for defending heinlein and insisting he be included and would be happy to provide quotes or whatever to entries on clarke or asimov...
and hoppy halidays.
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 49

xyroth

keep defending heinlein, and clarke and asimov. they were in the first wave of sci-fi authors who understood the science, and wanted to dramatise it correctly.

they share this tradition with jules verne.

with his books like moon is a harsh mistress and space family stone, among others, heinlein inspired people to live the dream. (similar to the way that seeing uhura on the bridge of the enterprise regularly inspired the first black woman astronaut to become first a scientist, and later join nasa and go into space. eventually it went full circle, and she was asked to do a walk on part in start trek.).


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 50

several, a/k/a random

exactly xyroth, all those were pioneers and provided some inspiration to future generations. incidentally, it's 'the rolling stones' copyright 1952. hazel stone later makes appeances in, oh gee, 'the cat' mostly and i think in 'to sail'
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 51

Lentilla (Keeper of Non-Sequiturs)

And a brief appearance as the young, red-headed scamp in Moon is A Harsh Mistress. She's been around.


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 52

Lentilla (Keeper of Non-Sequiturs)

And perhaps I'm being misunderstood! Several, what I was trying to say was that Heinlein invented the waterbed - nobody else could patent it because he had already described it in detail in Stranger in a Strange Land, and don't forget Double Star... with the crash acceleration couches. Somebody else could build it when the materials became available, of course, but they couldn't say that they 'invented' the waterbed, and they couldn't patent the design.

You're going to find that everybody wants this article to be the best it can be. It's being held to a higher standard than an article about soda bread or the New York transit system, because there are a LOT of Heinlein fans. Is this fair? No. Will you hear about it if there's something that's not right? Oh, yes. So it's worth the trouble to forge this into shape.


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 53

several, a/k/a random

yeah, lots of emotion. i understand. let me know if i can help. RAH was right behind ray bradbury in what i started in sci-fi reading, just ahead of asimov and clarke. and and and...thanks.
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 54

xyroth

the article is going very well, most articles of this quality would already have been picked.

by the way several, a/k/a random, while the story might be called the rolling stones, the book is definately called space family stone.


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 55

several, a/k/a random

yep, it has been published under that name, too.
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 56

several, a/k/a random

so now that i'm in winter hibernation mode, is there anything further i can do to help make a Heinlein Guide entry? you folks seem to have it well in hand, but if you need quotes from a book, i prob'ly got it.
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 57

anhaga

I just re-read Time Enough for Love a month or so ago. Doesn't it strike anyone else (particularly now that Pete Townshend et. al. have there charges) that Heinlein in his later years was simply writing about the joys of incestuous pedophilia (or pedophilic incest)? As long as it didn't produce "defectives", Lazarus Long was into sex with any relative (of any age) he could find. I find that whole subtext problematic, especially when it ceases to be subtext and becomes something openly argued in favour of.

anhaga


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 58

several, a/k/a random

the world that Heinlein created in his novels at the end of his career had a genetic sorter, for lack of a better term, that prevented any defectives (or non-optimal humans, if you wish) from being bourne. in other words, sex was sex, and children were created on purpose.
lazarus long most certainly copulated with his biological mother, maureen johnson, just as he copulated with his 'clone' daughters, Laz and Lor, and just about every other female who said 'yes' AND Lazarus
explained his childbearing responsibilites in 'time enough' in that he stood by his kids as best he could, as long as he could.
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A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 59

anhaga

I do understand what you're saying and, to be honest, if Lazarus Long wanted to have sex with his mother and she agreed to it, who cares? But I reiterate, there is a pedophilic aspect to his sex with his clone daughters which is problematic. For that matter, Maureen's consent was hardly informed, thinking as she did that they were first cousins. I'm not trying to be a big whining voice of prudery, and I do enjoy reading Heinlein in spite of the problematics, but I think the problematics should be touched on in a discussion of his works. You discuss his "right wing" tendencies, which are problematic for many. A brief description of the subtext of the later novels is not a judgement, it is just a description. I think the entry is well worth the effort you've put into it, and I don't really mind if it goes ahead as is. It's just that I don't think the complex picture of Heinlein will be complete.

smiley - okanhaga


A650369 - Robert A. Heinlein

Post 60

Lentilla (Keeper of Non-Sequiturs)

Yeah, it bothers me... While yes, the reasons for incest are to prevent birth defects, there are other, stronger psychological reasons that Heinlein glossed over by saying 'intelligent people make their own morality.' I'm not so sure this is true. I would have loved to have argued it out with him, because of all his ideas, this is the only one that I couldn't even tolerate.


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