A Conversation for Peer Review

A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 1

Dmitri Gheorgheni

Entry: Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children - A87897145
Author: Dmitri Gheorgheni - U1590784

This is the entry I actually planned to write this weekend. I know how strange that sounds, but there it is.

Just call me a member of the lunatic fringe.

smiley - dragon


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 2

Chris Morris

Talking about causality with regard to the contingent facts that history deals with is a highly debatable subject; in fact, I'm currently involved in precisely that debate with an ex-h2g2 person on Facebook.

Try reading RG Collingwood for a good analysis of the difference between the necessary facts of the physical sciences and the contingent facts of history and social phenomena generally. smiley - smiley


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 3

Dmitri Gheorgheni

smiley - laugh That's why history teachers tell students about contingencies these days. It's absolutely not a simple question.

But a good excuse to rummage around in the cupboard, I think.


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 4

Dmitri Gheorgheni

PS to Chris: I think Collingwood may be at least partly responsible for some of the other 'historical skills' we teach these days, too, such as 'historical imagination', which is sure to pop up in exercises...of course, since RG Collingwood is no longer among the living, he, too, is now part of the unknowable Past. smiley - winkeye


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 5

Chris Morris

smiley - laugh


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 6

minorvogonpoet

This is an interesting story and introduces some people about whom we might want to know more smiley - smiley

The connections between Theodore Roosevelt, fringes and a magazine of the 1870s seem a bit tenuous, but perhaps that's what you're saying. smiley - smiley One thing influences another, that influences a third and, before you know where you are, you've got a craze! smiley - smiley

I think, by the way, that other early environmentalists started as hunters. Hunting led to an interest in the animals and their habitats, which led to a desire to conserve them.


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 7

Florida Sailor - going 'round the world at 1,000 MPH

Looking back into the dusty h2g2 catacombs I found this http://h2g2.com/dna/h2g2/alabaster/A568190 Why it has not found its way into the Edited guide is beyond my understanding. I could maybe find a few things to add, but not much. I am tempted to grab it and put it into Peer Review myself,

Just for the record I do not know any US hunters who are not also conservationists (a little different than ecologists, primarily on issues such as hunting itself).

F smiley - dolphin S


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 8

Dmitri Gheorgheni

I stand by 'contradictorily'. TR's African safari - which he got Andy Carnegie to pay for by lying to him - was not about conservation. It wasn't about peacemaking, either, no matter what he said to Carnegie.

Wild Bill Cody wised TR up about conservation, and the National Park Service was the result. The history's too long to get into here, but it's interesting. Anybody want to do a Guide Entry? smiley - smiley

I was surprised we didn't have a Teddy Roosevelt Guide Entry, too, FS. If you'd like to write one, I'm sure it would be welcome. Talk to Bluebottle or Galaxy Babe - I'm not sure what the procedure is with picking up that unedited Entry. smiley - cheerup


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 9

Florida Sailor - going 'round the world at 1,000 MPH

I did not mean my comment as a correction to your wording, I was rather explaining for MVP. T R had many sides, some of which appear quite contradictory.

As I understand it anything in the unedited guide is fair game as long as you list the original Researcher as a co-author and leave a message on their home page so they can object if they want to. I will post a message to >BB to confirm.

F smiley - dolphin S


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 10

Dmitri Gheorgheni

smiley - ok Absolutely, to both comments!


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 11

SashaQ - happysad - Editor

smiley - book An excellent Entry - the Further Reading looks good indeed smiley - ok

Fascinating fashion facts - I'd not thought that much about hair terminology before, apart from my desperate search for the 'magic words' that my hairdresser can understand for what I want when I'm in the salon... I didn't realise that 'fringe' was a relatively new thing, but I guess men's haircuts were not particularly thought about in detail...


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 12

Dmitri Gheorgheni

smiley - laugh I guess not.

As far as I can tell, fringe goes back to the 14th Century, but only to describe non-hair fringes - like the ones on shawls or rugs.

Actually, in the US, we call the kind of haircut Henry V had a 'bowl cut'. This is because on the frontier, in the absence of barbers, a bowl and a pair of scissors were the tonsorial tools of choice. Which may explain Moe Howard's hairstyle.

My dad had a favourite story about my grandfather, who was quite a good amateur barber, but a renowned practical joker. One day, while he was cutting hair for one of the boys out in the farmyard, he spied one of their young cousins coming up the road. He sent another kid into the house. By the time the cousin had arrived, my grandfather had clapped a soup bowl onto his son's head, and was pretending to cut away.

'You want a haircut?' he asked his nephew. 'You can be next.' Then guffawed as the kid ran all the way back to his own farm.


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 13

ChiKiSpirit III

Okay. I found it. Thank you.smiley - ok


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 14

Dmitri Gheorgheni

smiley - ok


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 15

Tavaron da Quirm - Arts Editor

Interesting Entry. smiley - smiley

(I read the whole book you sent me the link to by the way.)


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 16

Dmitri Gheorgheni

smiley - laugh Cool!


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 17

SashaQ - happysad - Editor

I know the bowl cut, yes ('pudding bowl' is another name for it). Luckily I've never had that inflicted on me, but some hairdressers managed to do something perilously close even without the aid of a bowl... I'm not surprised the cousin ran away in that tale!

Roosevelt's essay is good for a chuckle - I can imagine the art of the Knights of the Isosceles Triangle smiley - magic but I'm more of an Octagonist myself http://images.slideplayer.com/16/5120466/slides/slide_29.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a3/Ammann-Beenker_tiling_example.png

'Four Days' is a well-crafted tale smiley - biggrin Mr Preston is an inspiring teacher indeed and it is lovely that Adelaide found somewhere she was wanted smiley - biggrin

'Dotty Dimple' is quite different from that! Cleverly done with the child's language, though: "'I didn't hurt me velly bad. I'm weller now... How do you do, little sister?' The baby made no reply." smiley - laugh


A87897145 - Notes on the Lunatic Fringe: Art, Hair, and Emancipated Children

Post 18

Dmitri Gheorgheni

The Sophie May anthropology of kids is pretty impressive. smiley - laugh

I like that second picture: it would make a great stained-glass window.


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