A Conversation for Project: Messier Objects

Messier help

Post 1

Jimi X

Please sign up below if you have an interesting story about the Messier objects or if you would like to help in the researching of this entry.

Thanks! smiley - smiley

- X


Messier help

Post 2

Yeliab {h2g2as}

Not yet. Hmm... let me think...

I'd like to help research this. Give me a shout.


Messier help

Post 3

Jimi X

Thanks Nick! I'll let you know when Peta tells us to go 'live' with this. smiley - smiley

- X


Messier help

Post 4

Jimi X

Of course, since I've fleshed out some of the biographical stuff on Messier and made a list of all 110 catalogue numbers, we could get started....

Any information you have on any of the Messier objects can be included in the forum here or by starting a new forum if you prefer. What I'd like to do is list the object's more common name (like M1 - the Crab Nebula), which constellation the object is located in (with Latin and English names), a brief description of the object, and any other information (like visible to the naked eye, a great object for small telescopes or binoculars, a beautiful example of a barred-spiral galaxy, etc.)

Of course, you'll receive Reseacher credit for any information you provide as well as the warm feeling of working on one of the initial projects for the soon-to-be announced h2g2 University. smiley - smiley

- Jim


Messier help

Post 5

Yeliab {h2g2as}

Sure thing I'll get cracking. Got a space CD that will help. Do you think my article on Aurorae would go in to this uni thing. Hm... what is this uni thing?


Messier help

Post 6

Jimi X

The University scheme is something Peta and Abi are working on in the hopes (I think) of increasing the amount of Researcher cooperation. But maybe one of them can explain it better than me! smiley - winkeye

I think we're planning to link to all sorts of space stuff here on h2g2 so I'll mention your article to the others. I'll pop over to your page and get the url! smiley - smiley

Thanks!

- Jim


Messier help

Post 7

Jimi X

I found this about the University scheme:
'The University is the home of h2g2 knowledge. You don't need a degree to join the university, just enthusiasm.

We're about to start a new scheme in h2g2, which allows Researchers to become Field Researchers within the University Departments. Each Field Researcher volunteers to develop a number of new entries, within their chosen field. They can work
alone, or enlist the skills and knowledge of other researchers. Sound interesting..?'

Details can be found here: http://www.h2g2.com/C573

Hope that helped! smiley - smiley


Messier help

Post 8

Peta

I've just posted this page up on h2g2, which summarises the Field Researcher plan.I want people to take on what is a Sub-category of information, in the first place, for instance, 'Covent Garden' rather than 'London', or 'Van Gogh, a life history' as opposed to 'Impressionist Artists' or 'Art'. It has to be a project that is achievable in six weeks. It's much better to start small and specific, and build the subject area over time.

http://www.h2g2.com/A339059


Messier help

Post 9

Jimi X

Thanks Peta! smiley - smiley


Messier help

Post 10

Jimi X

Hey Nick. I'm giving you the official shout. While the project doesn't 'officially' begin until 12 June, I've jumped the gun a bit and am on the way. I wrote up a couple of the easy Messier objects already.

Feel free to do write-ups in the forums or mail me directly. I'd like to keep the object write-ups as short as possible so the page is readable.

Thanks!! smiley - smiley

- Jim


Messier help

Post 11

Yeliab {h2g2as}

OK I'll e-mail you then. Umm, I'll wait till Friday as wed and thurs I have 2 A-levels. After I'll be free for a couple of hours and type away.

Bye the bye did you see Mercury today (or recently). It was clear today for all but the west horizon so I missed it. DOH!. 9th it's highest so I'll still keep an eye out.

Plus there is a CME on the way so there could be a good show of aurorae in the next couple of days.

Keep observing,

Nick


Messier help

Post 12

Jimi X

Yep. I mentioned Mercury in the Observatory and I've seen it a couple of times this month. Cloudy yesterday. I want to try and watch it as much as I can so I can see the phases progress.

And I got your mail and have added them in. Thanks! Good luck with the tests! smiley - smiley


Messier help

Post 13

Yeliab {h2g2as}

Great. I'm still looking forward to seeing it. but it's cloudy for the next few days.

This new format is a trifle wierd. I don't like the way that the forums have been split in to blocks of 10 and you have to load up more recent enteries. And it's lost the nice ordering of the enteries, so you can't tell at a glance which it relates to.


Messier help

Post 14

Jimi X

Peta says they're going to fix that in the next upgrade which is 'hard on the heels' of this one. So we'll see then.

There's always this to amuse though - smiley - tongueout


Messier help

Post 15

Deek

My Boy's Own book of Messier numbers lists the following which I hope is of help with the list, I've included the New General Catalogue No where given as well.
M2. 7089 Aquarius mag 7.5 globular cluster
M3. 5272 Canes Venatici mag 7.0 globular cluster
M4. 6121 Scorpio mag 7.5 globular cluster
M5. 5904 Serpens mag 7.0 globular cluster
M6. 6405 Scorpio mag 4.5 open cluster
M7. 6475 Scorpio mag 3.5 open cluster
M8. 6523 Sagittarius mag 5.0 'The Lagoon' emission nebula
M10. 6254 Ophiuchus mag 7.5 globular cluster
M11. 6705 Scutum mag 7.0 'Wild Duck' open cluster
M12. 6812 Ophiuchus mag 8.0 globular cluster
M13. 6205 Hercules mag 6.0 globular cluster
M14. 6402 Ophiuchus mag 9.5 globular cluster
M15. 7078 Pegasus mag 7.5 globular cluster
M16. 6611 Serpens mag 6.5 open cluster
M17. 6618 Sagittarius mag 7.0 'Omega' emission nebula
M18. 6613 Sagittarius mag 8.0 open cluster
M19. 6273 Ophiuchus mag 8.5 globular cluster
M20. 6514 Sagittarius mag 5.0 'The Trifid' emission nebula
M21. 6531 Sagittarius mag 7.0 open cluster
M22. 6656 Sagittarius mag 6.5 globular cluster
M24. 6603 Sagittarius mag 6.0 open cluster
M25. .... Sagittarius mag 6.0 open cluster
M27. 6853 Vulpecula mag 7.5 'Dumbell' planetary nebula
M30. 7099 Capricorn mag 8.5 globular cluster
M33. 598 Triangulum mag 7.0 spiral galaxy
M34. 1034 Perseus mag 6.0 open cluster
M35. 2168 Gemini mag 5.5 open cluster
M36. 1960 Auriga mag 6.5 open cluster
M37. 2099 Auriga mag 6.0 open cluster
M38. 1912 Auriga mag 7.0 open cluster
M39. 7092 Cygnus mag 5.5 open cluster
M41. 2287 Canis mjr mag 5.0 open cluster
M42. 1976 Orion ........... emission nebula.'The Great Nebula' in Orion's belt. 'Birthplace of stars'
M46. 2437 Puppis mag 6.5 open cluster
M47. 2422 Puppis mag 4.5 open cluster
M49. ..... Virgo mag 10.0 elliptical galaxy
M50. 2323 Monoceros mag 6.5 open cluster
M51. 5194 Canes Venatici mag 10.0 'The Whirlpool Nebula' spiral galaxy
M52. 7654 Cassiopeia mag 8.0 open cluster
M53. 5024 Coma Berenices mag 8.5 globular cluster
M54. 6715 Sagittarius mag 8.5 globular cluster
M55. 6809 Sagittarius mag 7.0 globular cluster
M57. 8720 Lyra mag 9.5 'Ring' planetary nebula
M60. ..... Virgo mag 10.0 elliptical galaxy
M62. 6266 Scorpio mag 8.0 globular cluster
M69. 6637 Sagittarius mag 9.0 globular cluster
M70. 6681 Sagittarius mag 9.0 globular cluster
M71. 6838 Sagittarius mag 8.5 globular cluster
M75. 6864 Sagittarius mag 9.5 globular cluster
M77. 1068 Cetus mag 9.0 'Seyfert' irregular galaxy,
M79 1904 Lepus mag 8.5 globular cluster
M80. 6093 Scorpio mag 8.5 globular cluster
M81. 3031 Ursa Mjr mag 8.5 spiral galaxy
M82. 3034 Ursa Major mag 9.5 irregular galaxy, and a strong radio source
M89. ...... Virgo mag 10.0 elliptical galaxy **
M92. 6341 Hercules mag 6.0 globular cluster
M93. 2447 Puppis mag 6.5 open cluster
M101. 5457 Ursa Mjr mag 8.5 spiral galaxy
M103. 581 Cassiopeiae mag 7.0 open cluster

It may be worth pointing out that should anyone be inspired enough to go outside and start looking for these objects that depending on the amount of light scatter they have in their area, they are probably going to need at least binoculars to see anything fainter than magnitude 5. Also most need a bit of perseverance to identify. Mostly, globular clusters and galaxies (even Andromada) and the like, appear as diffuse patches of light which need the eyes to be allowed to adjust to night vision for up to half an hour if you are going to stand any chance of spotting them.
As a pure amature I never had that much success, mostly due to light scatter from London, not a good area for stargazing, but I managed most of the better known ones. I was never able, 'frinstance to get M57 the Ring Nebula in Lyre, despite some hours watching although it should be fairly easy to ID. It can be quite difficult, I think, to recognise what you're looking at if you haven't seen them before, as these objects are not 'star-like' in appearance.
One of the pleasures of all this is the occasional spin off of catching sight of the odd light moving thro' your field of view as you catch sight of a satellite, or the quick flash of a meteorite across the sky. It's surprising how busy it is up there sometimes.
Also the Messier list is a Nortern Hemisphere thing, as it would be I suppose. Messier didn't list anything south of declination -35 deg.
All the best A.M.smiley - bigeyes


Messier help

Post 16

Jimi X

Wow!! smiley - smiley

Thanks AM! Great additions and great ideas! Thanks so much for helping out!

*gets giddy and falls down*

I was afraid nobody was looking at these pages!


Messier help

Post 17

Deek

Glad to help. I would have done so sooner but I've only just come across 'the observatory'. I must have missed the front page ad that you mention but I''ve got it bookmarked now.
I'm currently working on an article on the Apollo Missions but I guess that's outside the scope of 'Astronomy'' At the moment the article is taking on a life of it's own at 20k words, of which about 5k fit in a h2g2 page. I may have some pruning to do.
I've also got a list of the 80 odd constellations Latin/EnglishAbbv. which I think you mentioned somewhere, that I can transcribe if that's any use in the future, although you probably have them already.
Anyhow, all the best A.M.smiley - bigeyes.

;


Messier help

Post 18

Yeliab {h2g2as}

Doh! Great! Is that all of them? *sobs if so*

Yeah I really should have added more *LOOKS ASHAMED* Thanks Austithe skys are clear but no telescopa therefore no observing!n!

I'm in America and


Messier help

Post 19

Jimi X

Hey Nick, when I saw you were in the US and Canada, I figured you were unable to get on-site. Have you had a glimpse of this alleged comet yet? We've been cloudy with random showers here for two weeks. smiley - sadface

I'm not sure if Austin has done the whole list, but I'll be checking it out later today. Also, if there's anything else someone would like to contribute, please feel free.

- I'll still accept personal observations of the objects and other information you're willing to impart. Like 'M51, go buy a big scope - this one is worth it!' or 'M107, dim and unimpressive - don't bother unless you really want to see them all.' smiley - winkeye

Thanks for both of your help! Feel free to check out lunar phases and meteor showers as well and tell me if there's anything I need to add there...

smiley - smiley

- X


Messier help

Post 20

Yeliab {h2g2as}

OOOHHHH where is the commet? Were gettig clear skys + in thje moutains so it's dark though slightly misty

N


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