A Conversation for Nikola Tesla

A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 1

Norton II

This is an informative little piece I originally wrote for college about a much neglected man. Most people think that Edison invented AC power and Marconi invented radio. In fact more than a little credit is due to Tesla for both these inventions. Please recommend this to the Editors because I think it is important to right an historical injustice.
http://www.h2g2.com/A315596


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 2

Gnomon - time to move on

This is a good article. I recommend it after some tidying up. Tesla is certainly one of the forgotten geniuses of electricity. He even has a unit named after him but no-one can remember what it measures! (Is is Magnetic Flux Density?).

Tidying:

The article is littered with ’ and “ which probably show up as characters on your browser. Change these to whatever they're supposed to be.

Instead of putting references as (Wagner,1999) put them as footnotes, using the tag in GuideML.

Good Work!


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 3

Blatherskite the Mugwump - Bandwidth Bandit

Hi Norton. At the moment, your article is a bit difficult to read, due to technical considerations. One was already mentioned, which is that this: &23343 appears at random places in the text. This happens when you type your article using a word processor like Word, and then copy and paste it into the h2g2 box. Your browser translates apostrophes from word into that gibberish, because that is what your word processor is saying when you copy it in. To avoid this problem in the future, I recommend you use Wordpad or Notepad to write your articles offline. I use notepad myself. It doesn't introduce special characters, like "smart" quotations, which get translated to the gibberish you see. As for this article, all you can really do is edit the piece and delete the gibberish, and put in your proper punctuation marks while online.

This article could also benefit from some GuideML. I've included the link to the GuideML clinic at the bottom of this post so that you can learn how to do it. It gives you a lot more control over the layout of the piece. For instance, rather than having those hyperlinks written out as full addresses, you can have them simply show up with their name, and when people click on them, it will take them over to that page. Just follow this simple format in your text, and then click the proper buttons to change your article type to GuideML:

Name Goes Here

This would produce a link to the web page address.goes.here that simply shows up as Name Goes Here in your text. Makes it much easier to read. And, for all those other nifty little tags, here is the home of the GuideML clinic: http://www.h2g2.com/GuideML-Clinic


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 4

Norton II

Thanks. I'm a bit busy this week, but I'll try and get it sorted. I'll let you know when it's done.


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 5

Norton II

I cleaned the page up and sorted out the references. Please let me know if you approve of the new arrangement.


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 6

Blatherskite the Mugwump - Bandwidth Bandit

Very nicely organized... I can now read it quite easily. It is obviously something you've spent a lot of time on, and it is very thorough. Clearly, Guide worthy. And I've only gotten through half of it... I'll return later and start at the radio part.

I broke off reading it because there was something I wanted to comment on, and I didn't want to forget it. I have quite a bit of knowledge about electronics, including motors and generators, but I was left confused by your description of Tesla's "solution" to the problem of AC. First of all, what was the problem that required solving? Secondly, what was that device that you described supposed to be... a generator? If so, where does the AC supply come from to feed the coils... another generator, or a feedback loop? And if you're already generating AC, why do we need another?

I'm someone with a background in this sort of thing, and I'm confused. Someone with absolutely no background in it is going to be even more confused. Also, you r description of the Tesla coil could probably do with a bit of amplification, since it assumes the reader is already familiar with this part. When writing for the Guide, you want to start from the assumption that your audience has no idea what you're talking about, because a large portion of them won't.


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 7

amdsweb

I thought that the AC supply to the AC generators came from exciters in the generator itself.

Also - DC current is actually better for long-distance transmission than AC current, as you don't experience losses due to the capacitance of the cabling. Of course, DC is harder to step up or step down.

Now I'm no electical engineer, so I'm probably spouting b******s.

smiley - smiley


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 8

Blatherskite the Mugwump - Bandwidth Bandit

What are exciters? What is capacitance? What do you mean by "step up or step down"?

I'm not asking these questions for myself... I'm asking for the other thousands of researchers whose only knowledge of a generator is where to put the gas and how to get it started.

As for DC, what killed it off was the core loss... too much power lost over long lines due to the backflow of current through the core of the wire. An alternating current minimizes that effect. AC is still much more efficient to transmit over distances, capacitance aside. Besides, isn't a capacitor a short for AC, and an open for DC? I think you might have meant inductance loss, where the alternating electromagnetic fields in two or more cables nearby interfere with each other, an effect minimized by shielding the cable. Then again, I may be spouting BS myself... it has been several years since I covered basic electronics.


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 9

Norton II

I'm in the process of updating the article to make the electronics a little more comprehensible. Be about a week.


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 10

amdsweb

Groovy smiley - smiley


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 11

Mark Moxon

Editorial Note: This thread has been moved out of the Peer Review forum because this entry has now been recommended for the Edited Guide.

If they haven't been along already, the Scout who recommended your entry will post here soon, to let you know what happens next.

Congratulations!


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 12

Norton II

I've tried to sort out the electronics explanations a bit. please let me know if it's any more comprehensible. Oh, and to the person who recommended me to the edited guide-Thank You!


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 13

Blatherskite the Mugwump - Bandwidth Bandit

Scene: a Hollywood set in complete chaos. A petulant writer accosts a preoccupied director.

Writer: But the congratulatory scene has to come before the Moxon scene!

Director: Relax, rookie. We'll take care of that when we send the film to edit. Are we ready?



Director: Ahem!



Director: Roll em. Marker.

Marker: Post #11, the congratulatory scene, take one.

Director: Action!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Congratulations! This article has been chosen for inclusion in the Edited Guide. From here the piece will mosey over to the What's Coming Up page, which will give more people a chance to offer feedback. Then it'll wind up on a sub-editor's desk, and then it's off to glory and fame as it appears on the front page.

I recommended the article before you made the proposed changes to the electronic stuff because I think this article is strong enough that it could go without any electronic stuff at all. But if you do manage to explain all this technical stuff to a general audience, they'll get more out of it. And since there's still time to make changes before it goes to the sub... what the heck. This article is too good to sit in the Peer Review for too long. Don't thank me... thank yourself. Someone would have had to recommend it fairly soon, because it's an excellent piece of work.


A315596 Nikola Tesla: Man or Magician?

Post 14

Norton II

Cheers!


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