A Conversation for The Tibetan Greenhouse Dugout

Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 1

The Ghost Of TV's Frink

I'd never throw a softball at this place JTG! I'll just come on in, sit back, and listen to everything grow..........


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 2

Post Team

This is wonderful smiley - smileySo peaceful,so..........green.........and is that a poinsettia over there?.........and the smell from those syringa's is just divine smiley - smiley May I take some to use in my oils please
J t G??
shazz smiley - winkeye


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 3

kats-eyes (psychically confirmed caffeine addict)

*carrying in cutting of the last blooming tea rose from my tiny little garden*
could I bring this to your refuge? I can hardly bear to leave her in my garden, she was so brave to have her last blooms open up in november.....


thank U, I'll stay a bit here too smiley - winkeye


postscript: "Her" name's ludmilla, she's blushing pink and very shy smiley - winkeye


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 4

John the gardener says, "Free Tibet!"

Ludmilla is welcome to a home in a Persian pot, a cobalt beauty blushing with the dust of the Silk Road. We'll put her near the lilac named Miss Kim, who may remember China.

Hi Shazz - Under the potting bench is a sack of tiny cobalt bottles, in which we may collect essential oils, like perspiration, a drop at a time, directly from our plants... lilac and rose, already. No distilation needed here.

smiley - smiley

JTG


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 5

Lonnytunes - Winter Is Here

Wow, how pleasant. Can I plant some garlic under that delightful kumquat shrub?

You never know when a vampire may try to invade your sanctuary


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 6

Post Team

Why,thank you JTG.That is just so perfect!I can collect all I need and not upset a single petal smiley - smiley
shazz smiley - winkeye


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 7

John the gardener says, "Free Tibet!"

An excellent idea, Loony, my friend... One must plan for all contingencies! Garlic is an excellent source of all kinds of things, and 'kumquat' is one of my favourite words. When vampires strike, we'll be ready... 'kumquat' may.

I seem to remember a discussion somewhen about a spring festival called 'Kumquat May'... a complete fabrication, of course; but one, I think, that is interesting enough to claim to have always participated in.smiley - smiley

May I offer my commiserations on the outcome of the World Cup.smiley - sadface But, as everyone knows, the Rugby Gods, when they're tried of Welsh choirs, rest in New Zealand. BTW who was that vision of loveliness who sang the New Zealand national anthem?

JTG


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 8

Lonnytunes - Winter Is Here

JTG, thanks for the commiserations. A yarn about the World Cup is on my page if you are interested. The accompaning forum has some good stuff in it.

The Maori lass, whose name escapes me, got a lot of flak in NZ for singing the antham in Maori instead of English.

A good response was given by a caller to talkback radio. To be consistant the All Blacks would have to replace the Maori haka (war dance) with Morris Dancing. smiley - bigeyes


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 9

John the gardener says, "Free Tibet!"

How petty! I think your national anthem sounded beautiful in Maori, especially in contrast to the thundering rendition of God Save the Queen at Twickenham.

Let's plant a Mamaku in that unknown beauty's honour.

smiley - smiley

JTG


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 10

The Ghost Of TV's Frink

JTG - do you grow anything that doesn't mind to be eaten? TV's dog is very anxious to be let in........


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 11

John the gardener says, "Free Tibet!"

Mmm... not sure I can adjust to the idea of a dog in the greenhouse. Even Spottydog on the Woodentops couldn't help getting into mischief:

http://www.roylewis.freeserve.co.uk/WOODENTOPS.ram

But since this is the Tibetan Greenhouse, where no-one is turned away, how about a spot (ahem) under a flowering dogwood (Cornus florida)? Which, as everybody knows, you can always tell by its bark. smiley - smiley

JTG


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 12

Peregrin

Wow, what a fantastic garden...I especially like the sub-rainforest feel.
Can I plant some Scaranthus Perrinus here? I'm not sure if I've got the spelling right, but it's very rare. Half of Europe's population lives in a nature reserve in Wales, and the other half grows in our back porch (in case the plant in the reserve gets stepped on!)
BTW, this being a Tibetan garden, do you have any native Tibetan plants here? Specifically, any of the illegal ones?!


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 13

John the gardener says, "Free Tibet!"

smiley - smiley Glad you like it.

Mmm...I don't think I know Scaranthus; but if half is in Wales, half on your back porch, we ought to have another half here.smiley - winkeye

The only illegal thing growing in Tibet, that I can think of, is a Chinese colony. Are you thinking of opium poppies? We've got lots of those; they 'pop' up everywhere.

At one time, opium poppies (Papaver somniferum) were England's biggest cash crop. It was grown for laudanum production, mainly; which, when mixed with alcohol was the nation's most popular drink. And we think we live in swinging times!

I look forward to learning about Scaranthus. Rare and endangered stuff is just what we like best here.smiley - smiley

JTG


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 14

Peregrin

I was thinking more of hemp (marijuana)... I've got some friends who were missionaries in Tibet, and they've got a picture of a valley filled with the plants!
I may possibly be wrong...they've been all over the place, but I think the picture was Tibet.

If you want endangered species, how about inviting the House of Lords to visit here?


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 15

John the gardener says, "Free Tibet!"

No thanks. I'll stick to aphids and mealie bugs. On the other hand, I think we could do without even those parasites.smiley - winkeye

There is so much political nonsense about hemp, I think it deserves a bit of a break from it all. If ever there was a plant that deserves refugee status, this is it. Grab a pot... of pot.

JTG


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 16

The Ghost Of TV's Frink

*shakes head*

But also LOL smiley - smiley


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 17

The Ghost Of TV's Frink

Sometimes I hate this forum system smiley - sadface
That post was supposed to go directly under JTG's post about the dog, and sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.

*shakes head confusedly*


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 18

Lonnytunes - Winter Is Here

JTG, as a memory of the Maori lass's singing may I suggest we plant a kauri (Agathis australis). An enormous NZ coniferous tree, they were once common but a lot were cut down in the 19th century for their resinous gum and to make boat keels. One tree, one boat. Only isolated pockets remain.

I have a young one, 30 years, in my frontyard. The oldest/biggest specimens are hundreds (maybe thousands) of years old. They are now protected and you need to get a government permit to cut one down. This usually only happens if a Maori tribe wants to build a war canoe for ceremonial purposes.


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 19

Peregrin

Do you think there's room in here for an entire 5000-year-old mist rainforest? It would give the place a nice atmosphere.


Glass Houses & Softballs

Post 20

John the gardener says, "Free Tibet!"

Ooo... I like the sound of that. Literally. I can hear it. Or is that the boiler. No... It's an ancient rainforest alright.

I've just been having a look at a Kauri (Agathis australis) in my 'Ornamental Conifers' book, which describes it as,

"...Undisputed king of New Zealand forest tress...with a trunk diameter of 8m and a height of 50m."

Sounds good to me. Let's have one. The MonkeyPuzzle tree pictured on the same page was photographed in Rotorua, which leads me to suspect that my book is also of NZ origin... aha! It is! (More about MonkeyPuzzles later... I have a plansmiley - winkeye)

JTG


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