A Conversation for Entry replaced

Aussie Grammar

Post 1

Diggers

You say you're interested in points of grammar and usage from other countries, including Australia.
Looking at your examples, they're spot on from where I stand - which is of course relatively upside down - and exactly what I teach my staff amongst other things. Things such as how to use commas between items or adjectives in a sentence, or not to start a sentence with Eg, are classic examples.
On the ship coming to Aus from England back in the '60s, we were taught that Australia uses American spelling. So I used center and color and so forth at school, only to be shot down in flames by an irate English teacher who said in a voice not unlike Zaphod's backup computer 'We don't call it English for nothing!'
That reminds me: When at Sydney's Taronga Park Zoo, an American tourist came up to me and asked in his very broad, very loud Texan voice: 'Excuse me, son. Where can I find the Kowallaby Bears?'
As an aside, perhaps you could include for your subbies a section on how to proofread. Don't get me wrong, I'm not having a go at anyone, but it would be handy to know the tricks.


Aussie Grammar

Post 2

LuckyPhil

Just to add a few comments to Digger's message.

The Australian language is very similar to the English version as apposed to the American version.

The main difference however between the English and the Australian language is us Australians tend to add in our own slang words.

Confused yet? smiley - smiley


Aussie Grammar

Post 3

The Jester (P. S. of Village Idiots, Muse of Comedians, Keeper of Jokes, Chef and Seraph of Bad Jokes) LUG @ A458228

And America steals them from us.

3:-þ


Aussie Grammar

Post 4

Lonnytunes - Winter Is Here

...and the clever slang originates in New Zealand


Aussie Grammar

Post 5

Diggers

According to New Zealanders, everything originates in New Zealand (!).

BTW I wuddent cunsudder fush 'n' chups to be vury cluver slung smiley - smiley


Aussie Grammar

Post 6

Wowbagger

Australians essentially use UK English, with their own particular slang. Anything American has only come about because of tv and movies.

Though I think that the Australian (and probably NZ) language is an ever evolving one. It always changes.


Aussie Grammar

Post 7

Lonnytunes - Winter Is Here

Only Australian drunks drink out of tinnies. Most legendary Kiwi drinkers have moved foward to the technological breack through of alumumuibm cans.

Oops sorry, been drinking.


Aussie Grammar

Post 8

Wowbagger

Tinnies are horrible, whether you call them tinnies (which I don't hear them called usually) or cans. Tinnies these days refer to small aluminium boats, so I suppose it's the same mistake, only different object.


Aussie Grammar

Post 9

LuckyPhil


"Tinnies" also being a boat can be a good thing. It means it can hold more beer. smiley - smiley


Aussie Grammar

Post 10

Lonnytunes - Winter Is Here

....don't come the raw prawn


Aussie Grammar

Post 11

Diggers

That brings up the point that slang differs from state to state. We buy beer by the carton. Others buy it by the slab. Tinnies, stubbies, tubes, piss, whatever you call it, beers aint beers.


Aussie Grammar

Post 12

The Dancing Tree

English as a whole is an ever evolving language. That's what makes it so good, and is what is responsible for it being used worldwide. Compare that to French, which refuses to be "corrupted" from the outside and isn't used as much.


Aussie Grammar

Post 13

Diggers

I think Monty Python got it right with John Cleese's French impressionistic "I spit in your direction."


Aussie Grammar

Post 14

Wowbagger

...fair suck of the sav!
(actually that one has different connotations these days - as I'm sure a certain presidential aide can testify to!)


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