A Conversation for Ask h2g2

Petty Hates

Post 18021

Bald Bloke

My dentist recommends interdental brushes rather than flossing, In his view most people can't / don't floss properly, and interdental brushes do a better job.
I've never been told the brushes only last two days, just change them when they wear down.
I normally get about a week out of them.


Petty Hates

Post 18022

winnoch2 - Impostaire Syndromaire Extraordinaire

I keep telling folk this and I *know* it's ma-hoos-ev-ley tempting fate, but I haven't been to a dentist for smiley - erm 10, 15 years something like thatsmiley - huh
I see dentistry the same way I see a car garage. I go there when something is wrong that needs fixed. Of my vague memories of dentist visits, I just remember leaving with pain or an odd feeling in my teeth that wasn't there before.
Maybe it's just me, but I'm not convinced on the argument of preventative dentistry. If you clean your teeth properly twice per day, job done. I tried flossing once smiley - yikes Again it just felt odd and likely to cause more issues than it might potentially solve or prevent. Only reason for flossing I can think of is to remove something stuck between my teeth. smiley - shrug


Petty Hates

Post 18023

Baron Grim

Because of an investigative news story where the reporter went to 50 random dentists in 50 US states and got nearly 50 different diagnoses and bill estimates, I avoided dentists for about 20 years. When I finally did go back to the dentist I chose one by recommendation from a friend. Because I rarely flossed, I had a lot of plaque build up. (I did brush at least once a day.) I had to go through a "debridement" to remove the built up plaque. That was not pleasant. But after that I now believe my earlier fears were justified. I was scheduled for THREE sessions to fill cavities. I didn't notice any cavities and didn't have any pain before going to the dentist, but he had X-rays so I went to the first two appointments. If I recall correctly, the first two appointments were for the one side, upper one visit, lower the next, then the third visit would be for both upper and lower of the other side. My insurance changed and that dentist was no longer covered. (Also we had massive flooding in our region during Hurricane Ike and his office went under water and he was closed for several months.) So I had to find another dentist. I went to one in my little town and when they did their exam, they saw no need to fill Any cavities. They saw a couple of places to watch, but with cleaning and fluoride they haven't developed further in the several years I've been going to that office. I still only brush in the evenings, and floss occasionally, and I rinse with a fluoride mouthwash in the mornings, and get regular cleanings at this local dentist.


The moral of the story I suppose is it's hard to find a good dentist.


Petty Hates

Post 18024

winnoch2 - Impostaire Syndromaire Extraordinaire

Yup, that story rather reinforces my, 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it' attitude to dentistry. Despite having obvious plaque build-up in places, I suffer zero pain and all my teeth seem healthy and solid to me. No doubt if I went to a dentist they would find lots and lots of problems.

I have a friend with a brain tumour. However he has been told, it hasn't changed size in years and probably never will. If they operate he may die. If they don't he may live to 100 with the tumour in situ.

I feel it's the same with teeth. Just because there is a cavity or other issue (if you believe the dentist who found them), doesn't mean that cavity will ever cause any problems. If it does, *then* arrange to get the work done smiley - biggrin


Petty Hates

Post 18025

Baron Grim

I should mention, my teeth felt wonderful after the debridement. There were actual spaces between my teeth again!

And I do trust my new dentist and hygienists and get regular check-ups and cleaning.

But I still don't know how to find a good dentist other than to go to several and get separate check-ups and recommendations. I'd like to see a journalist repeat the investigation I saw decades ago.


Petty Hates

Post 18026

SashaQ - happysad

Difficult indeed...

My mum's experience was a bit similar - she has some glue in her mouth and went through a phase of every 6 months going to the dentist, having her teeth specially cleaned (at a cost of £80), then a week later discovering that the glue had disappeared, so she had to go back to the dentist to get more glue (at a cost of £100) - after the third time, she decided to decline the special teeth clean, and the glue has lasted 10 months so far...


Petty Hates

Post 18027

Teasswill

I guess that there is a certain amount of subjective assessment in dentistry & some dentists are more relaxed about intervention than others. My current one does take time to show what he's seen & explain why he is recommending a course of action. I can see that stepping in early can save worse trouble in the long term. Depends how much you trust your dentist, I suppose.
I don't reckon to go as frequently as six months though - more like a year or more between visits, if I have no issues.


Petty Hates

Post 18028

Baron Grim

That investigative report I mentioned above was quite enlightening. What the journalist found wasn't just differences in levels of intervention recommended, it was differences in diagnoses. He began the investigation by going to his usual dentist, telling him what he was planning on doing (going to 50 different dentists), and having him perform the most thorough exam he could. Then with that information, that he had a small cavity and a minor crack in one tooth, neither requiring immediate intervention but should be monitored, he then goes to the other dentists. Some recommended root canals and bridges without even finding the cracked tooth! The diagnoses varied greatly with a minority of the dentists agreeing with the original. I'm now convinced that previous dentist I went to was performing unnecessary work to pad his own pockets.


Petty Hates

Post 18029

SashaQ - happysad

My PH today is things that cost more than they did last time but last for a shorter amount of time...

Related to shrinkflation, I think - things being made out of thinner material but the price not being proportional...

The armrest on my old wheelchair got a bit scuffed, but was still usable for 8 years. The new armrest is split already and it isn't even 3 years old smiley - blue


Petty Hates

Post 18030

Baron Grim

When I was a kid, my parents bought a top loading freezer. It's been running for at least 40 years now (only stopping for power outages, hurricanes and such). I was thinking about it the other day. Other than a rusty blob on the top where the surface got scratched, it has needed absolutely zero maintenance. In that same amount of time, I believe they've replaced 5-6 refrigerator/freezer combos at least. Everything is made with planned obsolescence these days. You can't repair hardly anything yourself, either.

My father also just swapped out his quite expensive electric lift recliner chair because after only about 6 months, maybe a year, the padding at the base of the chair back, his lumbar region, has completely either shifted or disintegrated, leaving him laying on a metal bar! He had a single recliner for my entire childhood.


Petty Hates

Post 18031

SashaQ - happysad

Ah, yes 'planned obsolescence' explains it...

My parents bought one of those top loading freezers, too, and it's still going strong smiley - laugh Manufacturers don't make them like that any more indeed...

Glad your father was able to swap out the chair - the padding disintegrating that badly in about a year is not good at all...


Petty Hates

Post 18032

Baron Grim

Well, he swapped it out with one he bought just a couple of years earlier that he didn't particularly care for. It was sitting in the back bedroom.


Petty Hates

Post 18033

SashaQ - happysad

Ah, that's not so good, but at least the other chair has padding rather than just a metal bar...

Today's PH: Weird salads

I went to a cafe today that had strange logic in their approach to a salad. I guess they thought: a tomato is a fruit but also a salad vegetable, and a melon is a fruit, therefore a melon can be a salad vegetable. The salad consisted of lettuce, onion, tomato, cucumber and a slice of watermelon smiley - erm


Petty Hates

Post 18034

Teasswill

That actually sounds quite tasty to me!
I get fed up with x including salad that is little more than token couple of lettuce leaves.


Petty Hates

Post 18035

SashaQ - happysad

smiley - ok

Whereas I don't even like onion, so I much prefer a salad that is just lettuce leaves smiley - laugh

It is good these days that there are notifications in many cafes and restaurants about how you can declare allergies and intolerances, but I do find it difficult to know what to declare as it depends on what they intend to give me - I certainly didn't know I needed to declare I dislike melon! Similarly when they sneak peppers into things that don't seem as though they should have peppers as an ingredient...


Petty Hates

Post 18036

Caiman raptor elk - Melting on a regular basis


I would have put mango and some chilli's in that, instead of watermelon.
Taste-wise that goes well with the onion, although raw onion is not the best thing for me to eat (especially if I have real life meetings the next day).


Petty Hates

Post 18037

Bluebottle

I suspect they intended to add watercress to the salad but inadvertently added watermelon instead...

Water mistake-a to make-a.

<BB<


Petty Hates

Post 18038

SashaQ - happysad

smiley - laughsmiley - ok Yes, mixing up watercress and watermelon would explain it indeed! smiley - eureka

I like mango juice, but there's something about the texture of most fruit that I just can't cope with... Apple I can manage smiley - apple but I still prefer not to have that in a savoury salad smiley - tomato


Petty Hates

Post 18039

Teasswill

I'm not good with most fruit either. Juice is more palatable than the flesh of fruit. I have a mild oral allergy to raw apples & pears (akin to tree pollen). OK if cooked - I love apple pie!

Today's PH - email from a supplier I use to tell me Christmas closing dates - only it doesn't give me the dates, just a link to their website. Would it be too much trouble to put the dates in the email?


Petty Hates

Post 18040

Caiman raptor elk - Melting on a regular basis


They probably want to be able to modify the data without bothering to notify you through a new email. Now you can keep opening the link to see if anything changed at your own leisure...


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