A Conversation for Legends and Lore of Limes

Peer Review: A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 1

CayteLin

Entry: Legends and Lore of Limes - A11475029
Author: CayteLin - U3656992

Just an essay about ordinary limes.


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 2

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

This is great, thank yousmiley - ok

Just a couple of links: http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/back_to_basics/citrus.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/limemintandcoconutmi_81429.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/keylimepie_8393.shtml - Key Lime Pie is my most favourite dessertsmiley - drool

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/limesyrup_72368.shtml - lime syrup - I can recommend that served on pancakes toosmiley - ok

smiley - drool


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 3

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

Got carried away there, sorry, here is a list of all the lime recipes on the BBC Food website:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/apps/ifl/food/showrecord?templatestyle=text&config=ingredientname&page=1&pagesize=15&Id=89

You should choose the recipes to include in your entrysmiley - ok

and there's an H2G2 entry you can link to:
A2181674 - The Art Of The Martini smiley - stiffdrink
smiley - biggrin


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 4

CayteLin

Thank you for your prompt response. I'll have to try some of the recipes myself! I'll need to find out how to post references.on h2g2 and post recipes that have been vetted by hitchhikers.

Again, thank you.

CayteLin


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 5

CayteLin

Looks like the recipes are already endorsed by bbc.

CayteLin


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 6

tartaronne

Very interesting. smiley - ok I think I'll use lime more often now. smiley - smiley - My daughter uses lime for cooking all the time, while I have stuck to lemons, untill recently more common in Denmark.

I have a few remarks:

I'm not so good at English grammar, I just think there are some superfluous commas roaming about - and a dot where it should be a comma in a few places - and I miss a word in this sentence:
>>In vitro tests show antimicrobial ... etc.<<

Also you have 'anticeptic' twice in the first paragraph.

>>The citric acid in lime removers grime and..<< - removes


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 7

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

Recipes:

Take a look at the layout in this entry: A11454491
You'll see the recipe section - you can either post them as a bulleted list with clickable links, or describe a recipe of your own then go on to say "There are more recipes with limes at BBC Food" (providing the link)

You can check that Guide ML by clicking here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/test11454491

plus there's lots of hints and tips at the <./>GuideML-Clinic</.>
smiley - biggrin

Remember: Internal H2G2 links (like that Martini one I gave you earlier) Title of the entry
Outside links: text to appear in entry

If you need any more help just post and ask, we're here to assist smiley - smiley


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 8

McKay The Disorganised

Regarding scurvey - the British Navy did initially use Lemons, but could get limes at low cost from their Caribbean Colonies - therefore limes became the choice.

smiley - cider


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 9

BigAl Patron Saint of Left Handers Keeper of the Glowing Pickle and Monobrows

Yes, this is what I wrotre to the PR thread of History of the RN (A10138015):

'... in 1747, James Lind proved experimentally that oranges and lemons cured scurvy, but various other things (cider, vinegar etc) did not. Capt. Cook, during his round the world voyage of 1773-76 acted on Lind's advice and supplied oranges, lemons and pickled cabbage to his men. Of 118 men who commenced this voyage, only one man died from disease - and it wasn't scurvy.

From 1795 onwards, daily rations of lemon juice were compulsory in the British Navy. However, some time later they were replaced by the much cheaper and more inferior lime juice from British West Indies. (This gave rise to the nickname of 'limeys' for British sailors).'

The author used the info in the first para, but not the 2nd, so you could well incorporate the 2nd para usefully into your Entry smiley - smiley


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 10

Sho - unemployed again - Thanks Covid-19

nice entry smiley - applause

I think it would be easier to read if you broke it up with a few (sub)Headers, and deffo a recipe or two (I'd love, for example, a recipe for Key Lime Pie)

smiley - smiley


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 11

CayteLin

Thenk you for your input. I fixed the typos and put a dash in in-vitro. In-vitro means in a petri dish. I need to find a guide to punctuation somewhere on the net and take the time to check it over carefully. Denmark must be nice this time of year. Happy lime experiments in the kitchen!

CayteLin


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 12

CayteLin

Decisions, decisions, decisions! All the recipes look scrumptious.

Is there a way to get a tilde over an n? I'm using a Spanish loan word and it doesn't display correctly.

Thank you.

CayteLin


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 13

CayteLin

Thank you for the clarification.

CayteLin


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 14

tartaronne

>>In-vitro means in a petri dish.<<

OK - now I understand smiley - smiley

Denmark is lovely now, with sun and 15-20 C. The landscapes are getting greener by the hour, and I'm sure I can see the grass adding millimeters. The spring is a fortnight late this year, trees and plants seem determined to catch up. Spring has sprung smiley - boing.


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 15

BigAl Patron Saint of Left Handers Keeper of the Glowing Pickle and Monobrows

>>In-vitro means in a petri dish.<<

>smiley - erm actually, it doesn't quite mean this. Literally it means 'in glass', and it is a term used to describe a process which is made to occur outside of a living organism, e.g. in a test tube, Petri dish etc (Incidentally, Petri should have a capital 'P' as it is named after a person).

The opposite to this is 'in vivo', which means 'within the living organism'.

smiley - smiley


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 16

BigAl Patron Saint of Left Handers Keeper of the Glowing Pickle and Monobrows

PS You should put 'in vitro' in italics, as it is Latin. Miss out the hyphen. smiley - smiley


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 17

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

<>

Bookmark this page: A1098876 - Special Character Codes in Guide ML

A tilde over an n = &ntilde; (in place of the n)

e.g. the real Jamaican ca&ntilde;a, not the white supermarket stuff.

smiley - ok


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 18

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

<>

Could you explain what a snakebite is, for those who don't know?smiley - blush You could add a footnote to the word or add another sentence.

(In the UK, a "snakebite" is an equal mix of lager and cider, you don't put lime juice in it)

smiley - ta


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 19

Sho - unemployed again - Thanks Covid-19

I am soooo going to try Key Lime Pie! thanks
smiley - drool (<-- rare example of that smiley used in food related circs)


A11475029 - Legends and Lore of Limes

Post 20

Galaxy Babe - eclectic editor

Me toosmiley - laugh

Thank you for the update, CayteLin smiley - smiley


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