A Conversation for The Donner Party

More cannibalism...

Post 1

Blues Shark - For people who like this sort of thing, then this is just the sort of thing they'll like


I always like to see entries on cannibalism going into the guide - if nothing else it gives me a chance for a gratuitous link to my own entry on the Whaleship Essex at A671492. smiley - ok

I knew a little about the SDonner Party, as it served as the (very loose) basis for a rather strange film called 'Ravenous' with Guy Pierce and Robert Carlyle which i am absurdly fond of. It was nice to be able to read something about the origins of the story.

An esxcellent and informative piece about what happens at the limits of human endurance...smiley - ok

smiley - shark


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Post 2

Elentari

Thanks very much. I thought it was interesting when we did it in history, so I changed the work I did on it to make it suitable for the guide and there you are!


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Post 3

Peet (the Pedantic Punctuation Policeman, Muse of Lateral Programming Ideas, Eggcups-Spurtle-and-Spoonswinner, BBC Cheese Namer & Zaphodista)

If we're talking about cannibalism in the Guide, can I draw your attention to A302211... smiley - smiley I think that one was worth a link. smiley - chef


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Post 4

Blues Shark - For people who like this sort of thing, then this is just the sort of thing they'll like


And of course, another of the true stories at the heart of Ravenous...

smiley - shark


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Post 5

Elentari

I don't know whether that's edited, and apparnetly you can only link to edited entries in other edited entries.


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Post 6

Pinniped


The so-called "Custom of the Sea" is the drawing of lots to decide who gets eaten when a stranded party's food runs out.
Owen Coffin of the Essex is certainly an authentic case.
Patrick Dolan of the Donner Party (a member of the Snowshoe Party, or Forlorn Hope, who died on Christmas Day 1864) is possibly another. There are various accounts, but it seems that lots were drawn, although his companions could not then bring themselves to kill him. He died anyway (and was eaten) within a matter of hours, however.
Richard Parker (a 17-year old British cabin-boy) is probably not really a case. He was almost certainly killed and eaten without lots being drawn, while incapacitated by delerium brought about by drinking sea-water. But a character in fiction with the same name (in a story by Poe, which is clearly based on the real events) did draw the fateful lot.
Pedrillo is another fictional example. He was Don Juan's tutor in Byron's poem of 1819, loosely inspired by the Medusa shipwreck.
So there is more cannibalism about than you might think, and some of it is oddly romantic...


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Post 7

Elentari

That's really interesting. The story of the Andes survivors deals with the same things and its a great read. Was the Essex the one with Moby Dick? Or am I getting confused?


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Post 8

Blues Shark - For people who like this sort of thing, then this is just the sort of thing they'll like


The Essex is the story that inspired part of Moby Dick.

smiley - shark


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