A Conversation for Mnemonics and Other Learning Devices

Ways to remember stuff... besides tying a string to your finger.

Post 1

Lentilla (Keeper of Non-Sequiturs)

I've never used mnemonic codes to remember facts. I find the best way to remember something is to repeat it in more than one form of communication. For instance, I want to remember that metamorphic rock is created by heat and pressure from sedimentary rock. So I write it down in class. Then while studying later, I say it out loud. This way I remember it two ways - once spoken, once written. It's also better in the long run, because while you may still remember the code five years from now, what's the chance that you'll know what the letters stand for?


Ways to remember stuff... besides tying a string to your finger.

Post 2

The Researcher formally known as Dr St Justin

I think you stand a greater chance of remembering things if you're more 'itneractive' with them. In order of increasing 'memorability': Hear it, see it, say it, do it. If you're just listening to a lecture, it can be very difficult to remember anything other that the basic concepts. If you see a demonstration, this should reinforce the ideas. Saying things out loud helps because it (should be) making you think about what you're saying. Actually doing something connected with it (eg repeated calculations using a particular method) will help you remember not just the concepts, but also the actual processes.


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Ways to remember stuff... besides tying a string to your finger.

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