A Conversation for The 1970s

70's Music

Post 1

Svlad Cjelli

With the happy days of the 60's well buried and forgotten, the 70's drew to an angry conclusion with youth shaving their heads, taking on drugs to subdue the pain inflicted by the experience of knocking the head against brickwalls and not as much playing instruments as molesting them. Thus was punk born.
But Punk came after years of crossdressing and guys wearing make-up and singing about stuff from books made about hobbits. Led Zeppelin and Free played the kind of music you'd imagine kids conseived at Woodstock would listen to (and in many cases did because their parents made them listen to it). Marc Bolans T-Rex and David Bowie tried dressing up like girls and wearing make-up to look like sluts and everyone thought it was quite cool to look like you'd done your share of heroin while playing the guitar in the bath-tub, some even did their share and played electrical guitars in the tub.
A 60's revival was killed even though it included a naked John Lennon with wife.
Black Sabbath asked politely if it was about time to take in some darker forces, and they sang songs about the dark lord and doing yourself in, and made a game of firing members of the band. These members went on to having carreers that wasn't as much carreers as just hanging around waiting for reunions, as there were a great deal of during the next centuries.
So by the second half of the decade came punk and threw a fist into the face of the Flower generation, their fans, the music industry and, more than anything, themselves. By the end of the decade, the music industry was in shatters, and everyone were quite happy about it.


70's Music

Post 2

Bruce

The best part of the 70's was definitely punk & do it yourself hair gel (non of your store bought stuff then) for mohawks & the invention of slam dancing & pogoing.

Mohawks were accomplished with a home brew of starch, sugar, water & a varying amount of time spent on the ironing board trying hard not to burn yourself too badly with the ironsmiley - winkeye.

One of the more popular t-shirts/bumper stickers of the 70's was undoubtedly "Disco Sucks". Even Frank Zappa had a hit with his anti-disco song "Disco Boy" - perversely it was mainly a hit in the discossmiley - winkeye

Before punk lots of people were pining for the 60's (which really only happened in 68/69smiley - winkeye)

-;^)#
wondering where the photo with the blue mohawk has got to


70's Music

Post 3

Nonametraveller

I guess that if you were a punk then it would of been the best part.However i can't agree with much else that you say Bruce,mind you i didn't really relate to you back then either,apart from the fact that i thought it was fun that part of my generation were as wild as me yet so completely differant.
I remember most of the sixties,although i only started going out to clubs and discos at the end of it.i can clearly remember my "peers'raving about it though,not to mention some of my teachers at school.Even by the end though,67 onwards it was a mixture of flower power and violence,somehow all under the same banner of rebellion.
As for "disco sucks"being one of the most popular t-shirts ,well i don't think that is anywhere near the truth outside of the punk heavy metal brigade.Although i have to say that when the bee gees,travolta,and saturday night fever came around and highlighted what was going on it created a bit of a paradox, most disco people were in some kind of denial.They watched the movie,they listened to the music ,it was played at most discos,they even danced like him a bit and sometimes sang to the songs but they/we all thought he was a jerk(travoltas' character)


70's Music

Post 4

Nonametraveller

I guess that if you were a punk then it would of been the best part.However i can't agree with much else that you say Bruce,mind you i didn't really relate to you back then either,apart from the fact that i thought it was fun that part of my generation were as wild as me yet so completely differant.
I remember most of the sixties,although i only started going out to clubs and discos at the end of it.i can clearly remember my "peers'raving about it though,not to mention some of my teachers at school.So i don't think it only happened in 68/69.
Even by the end though,67 onwards it was a mixture of flower power and violence,somehow all under the same banner of rebellion.
As for "disco sucks"being one of the most popular t-shirts ,well i don't think that is anywhere near the truth outside of the punk heavy metal brigade.Although i have to say that when the bee gees,travolta,and saturday night fever came around and highlighted what was going on it created a bit of a paradox, most disco people were in some kind of denial.They watched the movie,they listened to the music ,it was played at most discos,they even danced like him a bit and sometimes sang to the songs but they/we all thought he was a jerk(travoltas' character)
I for one liked the punks though,many a saturday i would make a point of going down the Kings Road for a drink just to see you guys parading about...or should i say slothing about.You definately had a big effect on fashions too,later on i used to go to the embassy club and Billys which was Steve Stranges club,they were combinations of everything,disco(club stuff though) and the wierd and wonderful....brilliant times.


70's Music

Post 5

Dinsdale Piranha

I turned 10 in 1970, hence the music that says '70s' to me is stuff like Mud, Slade, T. Rex, etc.
Then of course, there was the Walrus of Lurve himself. I defy anyone to listen to You're the First, Last, my Everything without joining in.
Even though I love things like 'Psycho Killer' by Talking Heads and 'Straighten Out' from the Stranglers, it doesn't seem like the 70s. 70s to me means big spangly flares and platforms.


70's Music

Post 6

Nonametraveller

I would say that overall,black musos, had more influence than anyone or anything.


70's Music

Post 7

Kasia, P.S. of Syncopation,Muse of Classic Goo Fans, Keeper of Rainbows, Zaphodista (visit Crossed Purposes Pub: A429310)

1970s Music for me was mostly the Glam. I mean Gary Glitter, Sweet, Slade, also bands like "The Rubetts". Somehow it was the pure joy of life, the songs full of happiness and fun:'we are living today, let's forget about tomorrow'. And on the other side was punk, the underground music, as it starts. The totally contra music, which shows more and more the worser side of the life, the overwhelming consumption, which was driven in the edge in the 1980s; people not so happy and not so funny. But I think punk exploded really at the end of the 1970s and was more important in the 1980s.


70's Music

Post 8

Mike A (snowblind)

I'll be following this conversation - and the article - cos as a 90s kid, my idea of 70s music is that it went through three stages. 'Heavy' Metal, Glam Rock (not sure which order) and Punk, before the NWOBHM reaxched it's peak in 1980.

The 'heavy' metal of the early 70s is, as I perceive it, the classical stuff of Deep Purple, Lep Zeppelin, The Who etc. Of course, compared to the 80s, these guys were country&western guys smiley - winkeye
Then you had the odd hard boy (Black Sabbath and Motorhead), but I ain't heard enough of their material to start passing judgement smiley - winkeye

When all this was new, I guess it seemed amazingly hardcore, didn't it?


70's Music

Post 9

Nonametraveller

R&B...Tamla...Reggae and the likes of also played a huge part, maybe even more than thosa categories that you have mentioned.
I don't recall "hardcore"as being a word that was used back then,but i were to use it i think it would of only really applied to the original punks.I will never forget walking down Kings Road one day before they "made it" and seeing the sex pistols for the first time ...I was a major party animal,game for anything...but those guys were far too much for me.It was only whenbands like the stranglers and others started making it that i started to appreciate it.

As a show however ,it was all great entertainment,and it added the "spice" and general wildness of the decade.


70's Music

Post 10

Kandyman

The 70's British pop charts opened with Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes) by Edison Lighthouse at No1 and closed with Another Brick in the Wall (Part II) by Pink Floyd in the top spot.

British No1's from the 70's with my points out of 10 ratings follow:-

1970
Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)- Edison Lighthouse (5)
Wand'rin Star - Lee Marvin (4)
Bridge Over Troubled Water - Simon & Garfunkel (10)
All Kinds of Everything - Dana (2)
Spirit in the Sky - Norman Greenbaum (10)
Back Home - England World Cup Squad (0)
Yellow River - Christie (6)
In the Summertime - Mungo Jerry (8)
The Wonder of You - Elvis Presley (8)
Tears of a Clown - Smokey Robinson & The Miracles (10)
Band of Gold - Freda Payne (8)
Woodstock - Matthew's Southern Comfort (8)
Voodoochile - Jimi Hendrix Experience (10)
I Hear You Knockin' - Dave Edmunds (7)

1971
Grandad - Clive Dunn (0)
My Sweet Lord - George Harrison - (3)
Baby Jump - Mungo Jerry (2)
Hot Love - T Rex (9)
Double Barrel - Dave & Ansil Collins (7)
Knock Three Times - Dawn (2)
Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep - Middle of the Road (0)
Get It On - T Rex (10)
I'm Still Waiting - Diana Ross (8)
Hey Girl Don't Bother Me - Tams (10)
Maggie May - Rod Stewart (7)
Coz I Luv You - Slade (9)
Ernie (The Fastest Milkman in the West) - Benny Hill (4)

1972
I'd Like To Teach the World to Sing - New Seekers (3)
Telegram Sam - T Rex (8)
Son of My Father - Chicory Tip (7)
Without You - Nillson (8)
Amazing Grace - Royal Scots Dragoon Gaurds (5)
Metal Guru - T Rex (9)
Vincent - Don McLean (9)
Take Me Bak 'Ome - Slade (4)
Puppy Love - Donny Osmond (1)
You Wear It Well - Rod Stewart (7)
Mama Weer all Crazee Now - Slade (8)
How Can I Be Sure - David Cassidy (5)
Mouldy Old Dough - Lieutenant Pigeon (2)
Clair - Gilbert O' Sullivan (4)
My Ding-a-ling - Chuck Berry (0)
Long Haired Lover From Liverpool - Little Jimmy Osmond (0)

1973
Blockbuster - Sweet (8)
Cum on Feel the Noize - Slade (10)
The Twelfth of Never - Donny Osmond (1)
Get Down - Gilbert O' Sullivan (1)
Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Old Oak Tree - Dawn (3)
See My Baby Jive - Wizzard (7)
Can the Can - Suzi Quatro (8)
Rubber Bullets - 10 cc (5)
Skweeze Me Pleeze Me - Slade (4)
Welcome Home - Peters & Lee (0)
I'm the Leader of the Gang - Gary Glitter (6)
Young Love - Donny Osmond (1)
Angel Fingers - Wizzard (5)
Eye Level - Simon Park Orchestra (7)
Day Dreamer - David Cassidy (1)
I Love You Love Me Love - Gary Glitter (3)
Merry Xmas Everybody - Slade (6)

1974
You Won't Find Another Foll Like Me - New Seekers (3)
Tiger Feet - Mud (7)
Devil Gate Drive - Suzi Quatro (7)
Jealous Mind - Alvin Stardust (4)
Billy Don't Be a Hero - Paper Lace (5)
Seasons in the Sun - Terry Jacks (8)
Waterloo - Abba (7)
Sugar Baby Love - Rubettes (8)
The Streak - Ray Stevens (3)
Always Yours - Gary Glitter (1)
She - Charles Aznavour (4)
Rock Your Baby - George McCrae (4)
When Will I See You Again - Three Degrees (3)
Love Me For a Reason - Osmonds (1)
Kung Fu Fighting - Carl Douglas (1)
Annie's Song - John Denver (4)
Sad Sweet Dreamer - Sweet Sensation (9)
Everything I Own - Ken Boothe (5)
Gonna Make You a Star - David Essex (5)
You're My First, My last, My Everything - Barry White (7)
Lonely This Christmas - Mud (9)

1975
Down Down - Status Quo (7)
Ms Grace - Tymes (4)
January - Pilot (7)
Make Me Smile (Come up and See Me) Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel (9)
If - Telly Salvalas (1)
Bye Bye Baby - Bay City Rollers (8)
Oh Boy - Mud (2)
Stand By Your Man - Tammy Wynette (0)
Whispering Grass - Windsor Davies & Don Estelle (0)
I'm Not in Love - 10cc (7)
Tears on My Pillow - Johnny Nash (5)
Give a Little Love - Bay City Rollers (8)
Barbados - Typically Tropical (2)
I Can't Give You Anything (But My Love) - Stylistics (8)
Sailing - Rod Stewart (4)
Hold Me Close - David Essex (5)
I Only Have Eyes For You - Art Garfunkel (7)
Space Oddity - David Bowie (10)
D.I.V.O.R.C.E. - Billy Connolly (7)
Bohemian Rhapsody - Queen (10)

1976
Mamma Mia - Abba (7)
Forever and Ever - Slik (7)
December '63 (Oh What a Night) Four Seasons (6)
I Love To Love (But My Baby Loves to Dance) - Tina Charles (3)
Save Your Kisses For Me - Brotherhood of man (0)
Fernando - Abba (5)
No Charge - JJ Barrie (0)
Combine Harvester (Brand New Key) - Wurzels (0)
You To Me Are Everything - Real Thing (5)
The Roussos Phenomenon (EP) - Demis Roussos (3)
Don't Go Breaking My Heart - Elton John & Kiki Dee (8)
Dancing Queen - Abba (7)
Mississippi - Pussycat (8)
If You leave Me Now - Chicago (7)
Under the Moon of Love - Showaddywaddy (6)
When a Child is Born - Johnny Mathis (7)

1977
Don't Give Up on Us - David Soul (0)
Don't Cry For Me Argentina - Julie Covington (9)
When I Need You - Leo Sayer (7)
Chanson D'Amour - Manhatten Transfer (8)
Knowing Me, Knowing You - Abba (6)
Free - Denice Williams (5)
I Don't Want to Talk About It - Rod Stewart (8)
Lucille - Kenny Rogers (4)
Show You the Way To Go - Jacksons (3)
So You Win Again - Hot Chocolate (8)
I Feel Love - Donna Summer (8)
Angelo - Brotherhood of Man (3)
Float On - Floaters (1)
Way Down - Elvis Presley (7)
Sliver Lady - David Soul (1)
Yes Sir I Can Boogie - Baccara (2)
Name of the Game - Abba (3)
Mull of Kintyre - Wings (4)

1978
Up Town Top Ranking - Althea & Donna (9)
Figaro - Brotherhood of Man (1)
Take a Chance on Me - Abba (7)
Wuthering Heights - Kate Bush (9)
Matchstalk Men aand Matchstalk Cats and Dogs - Brian & Michael (0)
Night Fever - Bee Gees (7)
Rivers of Babylon - Boney M (0)
You're the One That I Want - John Travolta & Olivia Newton-John (6)
Three Times a Lady - Commodores (9)
Dreadlock Holiday - 10cc (9)
Summer Nights - John Travolta & Olivia Newton-John (3)
Rat Trap - Boomtown Rats (10)
Da Ya Think I'm Sexy - Rod Stewart (0)
Mary's Boy Child - Boney M (0)

1979
Y.M.C.A - Village People (7)
Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick - Ian Dury & The Blockheads (10)
Heart Of Glass - Blondie (9)
Tragedy - Bee Gees (4)
I Will Survive - Gloria Gaynor (7)
Bright Eyes - Art Garfunkel (3)
Sunday Girl - Blondie (9)
Ring My Bell - Anita Ward (3)
Are Friends Electric - Tubeway Army (8)
I Don't Like Mondays - Boomtown Rats (10)
We Don't Talk Anymore - Cliff Richard (0)
Cars - Gary Numan (8)
Message in a Bottle - Police (10)
Video Killed the Radio Stars - Buggles (8)
One Day At A Time - Lena Martell (0)
When You're in Love with a Beautiful Woman - Dr Hook (2)
Walking on the Moon - Police (8)
Another Brick in the Wall (Part II) - Pink Floyd (8)

Any comments on my ratings welcome.

Also, what does the above list say about us and what we were conned into buying - there is some real dross in there.


70's Music

Post 11

Nonametraveller

I reckon that over 80% of them would be on my worst ever hitlist..

And the older generation wonders why we were rebelling.....lol

It must be said that there is no real reflection there on what was happening in the clubs.


70's Music

Post 12

Mike A (snowblind)

No Sex Pistols??!!

I just remembered. If you'd have asked me what I thought about 70s music a year ago, then of course I would have known about what Nonametraveller mentioned in his post. My tastes have changed, and this has clouded my memory smiley - sadface


70's Music

Post 13

The_Poet

There is no doubt about it. I hated the music of the early 70's and there wasn't much around worth listening to or buying. It was only once I had become bored with the anti-music of Tangarine Dream, Gong, Mike Oldfield and other refugees from the 60's did I discover the music of the 16th century, jazz and blues (uncle had a wonderful 78 record collection) which sustained me for many years.

To me, the 1970's is a hole in the collective memory of music where nothing of interest (beyond the fact that it illustrates the vacuity of the time) ever emerged.


70's Music - The Who

Post 14

Trillian's child

I saw a Who concert on telly some time back and found that although it was from 1968 or 1972 or something like that, and apart from the clothes, it hadn't dated at all. The music is TIMELESS. This applies of course even more to Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple.

We listened to the Pirate Stations. When Radio One started up it was just a fuzzy noise in East Anglia, no one thought of pointing transmitters our way. We had Radio Caroline, Radio London and Radio Veronica.

We managed without drugs pretty well, as long as we could take a cup of tea under a blanket and listen to John Peel every Sunday afternoon (First on Radio London, later on Radio One, as good as reception allowed)


70's Music - The Who

Post 15

From Distant Shores

In addition to the mainstream music of the times, there are three notable schools of music which spring to mind.

The first was the Canterbury Sound of Soft Machine, Caravan, Kevin Ayers, Hatfield and the North, etc.

The second was the Velvet Underground rooted New York sound of the likes of Talking Heads and Suicide.

The third was the two-tone ska revival.

Also as the article mentioned, the seventies was the period during which Bob Marley successfully mixed rock with reggae to appeal to a wider audience.


70's Music - The Who

Post 16

Mike A (snowblind)

Hey, what about Eric Clapton and his 70s stuff?


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