A Conversation for Guinness

Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 1

Nightfever

They really went and messed up the names on the world market you know...

Smithwicks in Ireland is Kilkenny everywhere else.
Kilkenny beer in Ireland is sort of like Killian's Red in USA. But we had NEVER heard of it before we went there last summer. We referring to myself and two other students from my class...

Just thought that you might like to know...


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 2

Munchkin

Er, if Smithwicks in Ireland is Killkenny everywhere else, what did I drink in Canada a few years ago that claimed to be Smithwicks?
Also, does anyone know if you can still get Gillespies anywhere? It has vanished from Glasgow, leaving nought but a tasteful mirror in my local, the Uisghe Beatha.


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 3

Nightfever

Ummm...well...I've never been to Canada, so I don't rightly know. Maybe (if it was an Irish pub) it was the actual stuff...but it's not in the states because they can't pronounce Smithwicks properly! smiley - winkeye

Maybe it's just the states that has KilkennySmithwicks and nowhere else...

As for "Uisghe", is that how "Uisce" is spelt in Scotland or is that an old celtic way of spelling it?? I don't know...I have NO sense of history!

smiley - winkeye


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 4

Munchkin

The Scottish Gaelic spelling of Water of Life is Uisghe Beatha. Also happens to be the name of a grand pub, just round the corner from me. It has a Spitting Image style puppet of Margaret Thatcher suspended by a tartan scarf round her neck from the ceiling. Normally gets called Ishkies by slow thinking Glaswegians. Was once refered to as "That thing that looks like a prison" by a group of Anzacs I met. Hmmm, I feel an entry coming on, let it grow in my head for a while I think.


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 5

Mebbekew

Both Kilkenny and Smithwicks are available in Ontario, Canada at most local beer stores. I'm not sure who brews them, however...


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 6

Dudemeister

Yes, I was just about to make the same comment (also writing from Ontario). We also get Caffrey's on tap, and in cans (draughtflow). I've heard it's a lot better in Ireland - as is the Guinness. Still, for an Ontario selection, I think Caffrey's is about the best pale ale/bitter kind of brew you can easily get here.


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 7

CIG WebGeek

They're two completely different beers (in Canada, at any rate). Smithwicks is slightly darker, and a bit more bitter than Kilkenny. Kilkenny is even poured through a "sparkler" tap, so as to get that nice creamy "Guiness-esque" head.


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 8

Nightfever

Hmmm...sounds like proper kilkenny alright. As for Caffery's?? I think that it tastes like muck! Sorry...just had to get that out of me... smiley - winkeye

Ummm...any you guys have "Breo" where you come from?? As in "white Guinness"?? That term is used in the VERY loosest possible sense of the word of course. It actually tastes rather like Budweiser...sort of citrus-fruity...

Smithwick's should be very dark red with a beer head and Kilkenny just dark red-ish with a Guinness head as the man said...

smiley - smiley


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 9

Dudemeister

Caffrey's might be muck.. This is relatively speaking of course - I would gladly be in a real pub in Dublin drinking a real pint discussing this, but I live too far away. We have to make do over here. I don't believe a good beer travels well .. so maybe Caffrey's ends up being just as cruddy as some of the others (When in England I enjoy a good pint of Usher's or Courage Directors, if in London, and that's all they have - or Guinness when in a stout mood). I have yet to taste an imported draught beer tasting the same here as from where it came from.

Nope, never heard of Breo. There is Brio Chinoto - an Italian coke thing that is probably closer to beer than Budweiser, since you mention it. US Budweiser despite regal claims, would not pass the German Rheinheitsgebot for purity if you took out half the ingredients. Let alone the lack of taste, or even a reasonable trace of alcohol. The Bass Shandy I bought from the newsagent as a kid is more intoxicating than that. If Budweiser had a citrus taste that would be something - I think it tastes more like it looks, especially with the lack of any head on it.

Incidentally they brew a somewhat different beer with 5% alc. in Canada with the same Bud label. It gets untrained US visitors very drunk before they realise they have suddenly consumed double the alcohol they thought they had.


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 10

Munchkin

Whoops, just realised that the pub is spelled Uisge Beatha. I am now horribly confused about the Gaelic spelling of Whisky. Will go and look it up.
It's the alcohol that confuses me I tell you.


The truth - Kilkenny beer in Ireland... and Canada!

Post 11

Dudemeister

OK,

Living in Ontario, Canada, and remembering that we get both Kilkenny and Smithwichs bottled/canned for sale here - I though I would mount a research project - go to the liquor store (aptly named Liqour Control Board of Ontario - if ye have been here ye shall know) and buy some Kilkenny and Smithwicks, and read the labels (actually I bought 8 for the sake of this project). I am enjoying it now.

Kilkenny is sold here in "draughtflow" cans as well as on draught in so called "Irish Pubs" - Canadian bars with a few Irish beers on tap, some shamrocks and green things for decor, and the odd visiting Irish or Irish-like musician or band. It is brewed at the St. Francis' Abbey brewery in Kilkenny "and" in Dublin by Guinness Ltd.

Smithwicks (also available in pubs here) is bottled and pours like a bottled beer (naturally). They are completely different beers. This is brewed by E. Smithwick's & Sons, Kilkenny, Eire. It is brewed at the the "Smithwick's" brewery on the site of St. Francis' Abbey in Kilkenny.

So either both breweries are the same and have two different brands, or somehow two competitors coexist on the same plot of land, making their beer. I would think Guinness would have the muscle here. Perhaps Guinness bought the rights to use the Abbey name somehow and brew it all in Dublin, or they license production from Smithwick's?

I could always ask someone at either (or the) company. Perhaps you know?

Anyway they're both excellent beers.


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 12

Dudemeister

See my research project results above. You might try doing the same - about 4 of each will do. Kilkenny comes in 4 packs here.


The truth - Kilkenny beer in Ireland... and Canada!

Post 13

Munchkin

Sounds like they are both owned by Guiness, but still doesn't explain why the are different types in Canada and not elsewhere. Sounds very similar to Scottish and Newcastle who produce both McEwans and Youngers as brand names from the same brewery in Edinburgh.
Hmm, this thought has just caused me to wonder off to the website of the owners of Guinness (http://www.diageo.com) where I have noted that there are two different types of Kilkenny and three Smithwicks mentioned. Mayhap this is where the difference lies. Here in Scotland it is Kilkenny Irish Beer, what say the rest of the world.


The truth - Kilkenny beer in Ireland... and Canada!

Post 14

Dudemeister

McEwan's - thats the favourite beer of Dudemeister's Scottish cousin from Rutherglen - McDudemeister - when he comes to visit for some softball "supporting" (football - ie. football, is not so much the rage in N. America yet).


Scottish Beer has it's moments

Post 15

Munchkin

Any particular one. I have a particular fondness for 80/- (shilling). Not keen on their Export. Same goes for Youngers. Their No. 3 (now sadly defunct) was gorgeous, while the Tartan Special is pants. And all from the same brewery, how odd. Would highly recommend Caledonian 80/- (also from Edinburgh) which keeps winning CAMRA awards, when the brewery isn't burning down!


Scottish Beer has it's moments

Post 16

Dudemeister

McDudemeister seems to like the Export unfortunately. I try my best. Unfortunately we don't get much Scottish beer in Canada.


Scottish Beer has it's moments

Post 17

Munchkin

If you are anywhere near Ottawa then the Earl of Sussex pub was selling Caledonian 80/- when I was there in August. This is of course a bit like saying, "Ah, your from Canada, must know my auntie then." which is a common staple of people of limited geography.
Hmmm, wonder what they have on Scottish Beers on H2G2. Think I shall look it up, mayhap write something if they don't.


Scottish Beer has it's moments

Post 18

Dudemeister

Aye, I'm not very far away from the aformentioned pub - a matter of a couple of miles. I might go and see if they still have the 80 bob stuff. Often here the pub beers come and go, except for the Irish ones - supposedly a cultural thing .. and the English ones. ou should write a page on Scottish beers - for the general education of the public. Many people on this continent think more of single malt, tweed jackets, haggis, kilts, caber tossing and golf when Scotland is mentioned - A good learnin' on Scots Beer would be welcome.


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 19

Spartus

Just when matters appear to have been settled, I feel the need to poke my head in. Okay, in Kilkenny, you can get Kilkenny and Smithwick's. Kilkenny, in Ireland, as on Aer Lingus, is definitely a "red". It has a head similar to Guinness, but not quite so thick. Smithwick's, by comparison, is a dark brown (at least it seemed dark brown--the pub was dark) and reminded me of Newcastle, if anything. I live in California, and I really wish I could find a place that carried it, but I digress.
Caffrey's, on the other hand, is something I didn't have in Ireland, but Ant (U15700) introduced me to it in London. I have managed to find that here, at a few bars in San Diego, and one a bit closer to me smiley - smiley (San Diego is about 60 miles away--a bit far to go for a beer). In Ireland, I concentrated mainly on Guinness, for understandable reasons. And it really *is* better there, but it's difficult to explain why. It just is.
As for Breo, it was hard to turn around without seeing an advertisement for it anywhere in Dublin, or in virtually any pub. I didn't try it, for fear they would snicker at my pronunciation or something. And I know the Budweiser is much, much stronger over there, but I couldn't bring myself to order it, particulary after noticing that even *Carlsberg* looked dark next to it.
Now, did I settle everything, or did I add to the muddle? It's so hard to tell these days...


Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

Post 20

Dudemeister

Not really, maybe, sort of, look up a few replies - it looks like both are Guinness products - and a wonder of Worldwide Marketing.

There are some half-decent beers in California (made there) - different than the above imported types - but if you steer away from the mainstream, better for you. Remember we is talking beer here - I could go on. I mention that just in case someone thinks that the USA does not make any "real beer" - this is not strictly true.

I've been told Caffrey's is "muck". It's not too bad - but taste is personal - still does this beer travel that well?

There, thats my international fairness speech for the day.


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Kilkenny beer in Ireland...

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