A Conversation for Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

Post 1

Devonseaglass

Since this was written the British have caught on a bit about protecting the environment by recycling rubbish. It's still not as developed as in Germany, which has also probably moved on. We do now have recycling bins labelled 'Landfill' and 'Composting'. We also have smaller bins for cans, bottles (glass and cloudy plastic, but not transparent plastic). batteries, cardboard, and paper (including magazines and envelopes with plastic windows). Normally, where I live, one week there is recycling collection followed the next week by a landfill collection. The landfill collection goes to an old quarry, which is being filled in. (There are many in the neighbourhood). Once it is full, it is topped with earth and pipes are fed into it which takes the methane gas to a device to burn it and convert it into electricity. So landfill equates to a form of local electricity generation. I now find that I spend roughly 4 hours a day sorting rubbish into the right container. If it ends up in the wrong one it will not be collected and you may even be fined.

One note about the use of inches in Germany. Can this be a relic from the time before metrication when Germany used a system similar to Imperial measurements, or is it that American influence has had a small impact?


Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

Post 2

aka Bel - A87832164

A 'Zoll' (an inch) is a very old German length unit. We used to weigh stuff in ounces, too. I think all (or most of these units) were abolished when Napoleon Bonaparte forced the metric system on Germany and various other countries. I wrote a journal entry about it once, which read:

Did you know that he introduced the metre, litre, kilogram etc after he had come to power? He introduced a revolutionary calendar with a week having ten days, the Christian Sunday didn't exist any more, and he wanted the hour to have 100 minutes. smiley - bigeyes
As Germany was occupied by Napoleon's troops, the metric system was forced upon the Germans, too.


Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

Post 3

Devonseaglass

He failed with the knot, however, but did succeed with driving on the right.


Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

Post 4

aka Bel - A87832164

Pharmacists here used to weigh the ingredients for their mixtures in ounces for a very long time still. I'm not sure when it changed, but I'd guess they still did so in the last century, maybe as late as in the 1960s.


Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

Post 5

Sho - gainfully employed again

and I still buy my mince by the pfund...


Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

Post 6

Devonseaglass

Advice to German visitors to Britain. The metric system is used only sparingly. Most vegetables are still measured in pounds, liquids in pints, distances in miles, speeds in mph, heights in feet, and we still count in dozens and half dozens. Furthermore inches are used for some measurements.


Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

Post 7

Devonseaglass

In Britain we are not allowed to sell electricity back to the grid for credits after installing a solar panel. So no one does (unless they want to heat a swimming pool, or live in an isolated dwelling or yurt). Germans have that incentive and do install solar panels on most available roof space.

smiley - biggrin


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Advice to British Visitors to Germany and Vice Versa

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