A Conversation for Scold's Bridle - A Punitive Gag

Disbelief

Post 1

Gnomon - time to move on

I do not believe that millions of women were ever subjected to this sort of treatment, or even that such things were common.


Disbelief

Post 2

Emmily ~ Roses are red, Peas are green, My face is a laugh, But yours is a scream

You're quite correct Gnomon, I thought I'd said thousands. (can you change it to thousands, or do I need to post the request on EF) That they were in common use is, I believe is correct, it seems bizarre but then so were a lot of other things in that era. smiley - smiley

Emmily
smiley - bluebutterfly


Disbelief

Post 3

Gnomon - time to move on

It now be "thousands", rather than "millions", by the powers! (Curator's powers, me hearties).

smiley - pirate


Disbelief

Post 4

Pimms

I concur with the smiley - pirate In addition to that questionable fact there are a number of weasel phrases eg those using the word 'some'.

I was browsing on another site* yesterday and read in interest their averred aim to remove weasel words from information being provided.

"Weasel words are words or phrases that seemingly support statements without attributing opinions to verifiable sources. Weasel words give the force of authority to a statement without letting the reader decide if the source of the opinion is reliable. If a statement can't stand on its own without weasel words, [or] it lacks [a] neutral point of view; either a source for the statement should be found, or the statement should be removed."
Factual statements - especially surprising ones - benefit from sources.


*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Avoid_weasel_words


Disbelief

Post 5

Emmily ~ Roses are red, Peas are green, My face is a laugh, But yours is a scream

smiley - cheers Gnomon

I found two instances of the word 'some' Pimms. There were no records of facts and figures to quote, but the research I did indicated the scold's bridle was in common use, in what was then very much a 'man's world'. smiley - oksmiley - smiley

Emmily
smiley - bluebutterfly


Disbelief

Post 6

Pimms

The wiki admonition is for researchers to include sources for facts, so that sceptics can go to the source of questionable stuff and make their own minds up as to its veracity.

I remain doubtful that branks were as common as the tone of the entry suggests. You can imagine an eighteenth century estate-agent showing a prospective buyer around a new house "... here's the kitchen, which will naturally come fully-fitted ... what? the brank? ... oh, that has its own hook next to the whisks..."smiley - winkeye

I enjoyed the entry, but was primed for scepticism by the article I read yesterday over use of phrases such as "possibly orginating..." , "It is said...", "there are reports..." without providing any references for these assertions.
My own feeling over the Walton-on-Thames bridle story is that the dedication sounds as if it refers to the town of Chester rather than some disgruntled individual. However I can offer no suggestion as to why towns would present each other with such contraptions smiley - erm


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